Porta Asinaria

Rome, Italy

The Porta Asinaria is a gate in the Aurelian Walls of Rome. Dominated by two protruding tower blocks and associated guard rooms, it was built between 270 and 273, at the same time as the Wall itself. It is through this gate that East Roman troops under General Belisarius entered the city in 536, reclaiming the city for the Byzantine Empire from the Ostrogoths.

By the 16th century it had become overwhelmed by traffic. A new breach in the walls was made nearby to create the Porta San Giovanni. At this point, the Porta Asinaria was closed to traffic.

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Details

Founded: 270-273
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

i pm (12 months ago)
Very nice, not really widely publicized, ancient part of Rome. Part of the old city wall is still under reconstruction. The gate has nicely been preserved. There is an info board located between the gate and Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano.
Tony Hou (15 months ago)
I really like the historical buildings/ ancient city walls of Rome. Just around the corner of the must-go Archbasilica of St. John Lateran.
Rasp Berry (15 months ago)
Historical roman city gate (build in 272.) near to the Lateran basilica and the highest obelisk in the world. Historic site where Goths under Totila broke city defences and conquered the city from Byzantines in 546. Current road goes little left from old gate. The monument to Francis/Francesco of Assisi is right after the entrance to the city..
Jonny och Ann-Christine Andersson (2 years ago)
A beautiful port in the old city wall.
Julia Morrissey (4 years ago)
good place to walk from one side of the wall to the other
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