Trajan's Column

Rome, Italy

Trajan's Column is a Roman triumphal column in Rome, that commemorates Roman emperor Trajan's victory in the Dacian Wars. It was probably constructed under the supervision of the architect Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Roman Senate. It is located in Trajan's Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum. Completed in AD 113, the freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas relief, which artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101–102 and 105–106). Its design has inspired numerous victory columns, both ancient and modern.

The structure is about 30 metres high. The column shows 2,662 figures, and 155 scenes; Trajan himself appears on the column 58 times.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Foro Traiano, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 113 AD
Category: Statues in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Виктор (16 months ago)
Very detailed, and well maintained after almost 2000 years.
Mike Deane (17 months ago)
Finally got to see the original, after being one of the people who kept an eye on the plaster cast in the V&A museum.
Șerban Simion (17 months ago)
Great historical monument. Nice how it is preserved
Alex Langlois (17 months ago)
Very nice piece of architecture/sculpture. But sometimes it's better to step back to enjoy the view and see the monument from another stand point and another perspective. I really you to find a street, a little bit hidden where the column can be seen and enjoyed.
Justin Labelle (18 months ago)
Nice & calm. You can hear the soothing sounds of a nearby fountain. Let yourself get transported.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.