Skeppsholmskyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden

Skeppsholmskyrkan is a church on the islet of Skeppsholmen, secularized in 2002. Named after its location, the church was built 1823-1849 to replace a minor wooden church on Blasieholmen destroyed in the devastating fire of 1822. Inaugurated by King Charles XIV John and still officially carrying his name, it was designed by the architect Fredrik Blom as a neoclassical octahedral temple inspired by the Pantheon in Rome, borrowing the coffered ceiling while substituting the oculus for the temple-shaped lantern light. On all sides, the plain white walls restored in 1998 are pierced by portals whose four pillars support semi-circular lunettes. Inside the cruciform exterior, the interior sheet of the wooden double cupola is supported by paired doric columns and rounded arches. Accompanying the painted altarpiece are niches with statues of the apostles and two plaster groups.

The Skeppsholmen parish was discontinued in 1969 when the Navy moved to Muskö, and the church was secularized in 2002. Since May 2009, the building is called Eric Ericsonhallen, named after the Swedish conductor Eric Ericson and is a Concert Hall managed by the Eric Ericson International Choral Centre.

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Details

Founded: 1823-1849
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rakib Hasan (6 months ago)
Good place for small party
Nilanka Sooriyampola (7 months ago)
Good environment and good for musical performances.
Lisa Lundell (9 months ago)
A spectacular venue!!
Mirar (11 months ago)
As a concert hall it wasn't the best in this summer heat, but acoustics and light was good and the performance gets very close and personal. Was here watching a great Jesus Christ Superstar performance, everyone in the ensemble did a great job and I had a great time in the audience.
Monica Modigh (11 months ago)
Jesus Christ Superstar deserves 5 stars plus. But the hall is HOT, and acoustics could be better
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