San Giorgio Maggiore Church

Venice, Italy

San Giorgio Maggiore is a 16th-century Benedictine church on the island of the same name in Venice, designed by Andrea Palladio, and built between 1566 and 1610. The church is a basilica in the classical renaissance style and its brilliant white marble gleams above the blue water of the lagoon opposite the Piazzetta and forms the focal point of the view from every part of the Riva degli Schiavoni.

The first church on the island was built about 790, and in 982, the island was given to the Benedictine order by the Doge Tribuno Memmo. The Benedictines founded a monastery there, but in 1223, all the buildings on the island were destroyed by an earthquake.

The church and monastery were rebuilt after the earthquake. The church, which had a nave with side chapels, was not in the same position as the present church, but farther back at the side of a small campo or square. There were cloisters in front of it, which were demolished in 1516. The monks were considering the rebuilding of the church from 1521.

The foundation stone of current church was laid in 1565. The work was not finished before the death of Palladio in 1580, but the body of the church was complete by 1575, except for the choir behind the altar and the facade. The decoration of the interior was completed subsequently. The choir appears to have been designed in essentials by Palladio before his death and was built between 1580 and 1589.

The façade, initially under the superintendence of Simone Sorella, was not commenced until 1599. The stonemason's contract provided that it was to follow Palladio's model and there were only minor changes. It was completed in 1610.

The campanile (bell tower), first built in 1467, fell in 1774; it was rebuilt in neo-classic style by 1791. It was ascended by easy ramps and there is now also a lift. There is a fine view across Venice from the top.

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Details

Founded: 1565
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dugald MacGilp (10 months ago)
Beautiful Church and art space. The view of Venice from the tower is the best. Nice cafe outside for alfresco lunch.
Bob Berno (11 months ago)
The Church was lovely and the view of Saint Mark's Square from the clock tower is breathtaking. And, the clock struck noon while we were there! Very loud bells!
Simmy Boby (11 months ago)
The whole place is so beautiful. The church interior to the bell tower was captivating. The view from the bell tower is so worth the £3 you pay.
Mojca L (12 months ago)
Love this place. It is so quiet and nice and out of tourists. Also beautiful church here
Vjollca dinaj (12 months ago)
It is a landmark of the City of Venice and absolutely a masterpiece. So great to visit it and learn about the church and Its history. When you visit the City of Venice you will get a lot of knowledge about everything which has to do with this amazing unique City on Earth. To me anytime I have the opportunity to to visit this city and the Church it is a great pleasure.
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