Dominating Lagarina valley since the 11th century, the Noarna castle was a possession initially of the Castelbarco family and later of the Lodrons.

The ancient Castel Noarna served as a setting for witch trials. Located at Noarna di Nogaredo, the Castle overlooks Lagarina valley since the 11th century and probably used to be a former Roman fort. The 13th century keep consists of the main tower, topped by Guelph embattlements, two guardrooms and the prison. Rounded arches testify to the building's Medieval origins.

In this castle a notorious witch trial was held, involving dozens of people from Lagarina valley, which ended with five death sentences to as many local women. Today, it houses a renowned wine cellar boasting about 35,000 bottles.

In 1177 the Castle was damaged during violent fighting and later on became the property of the Castelbarco family. In 1486 it passed to the Lodron family and developed its current look, as it got transformed into an aristocratic mansion. After 1876 the Lodrons moved out and started using the castle only as a summer residence. The castle was eventually abandoned towards the end of the 19th century.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luigi Sergio (2 years ago)
Castello medioevale bel tenuto e ristrutturato. Gestito dal FAI
Marina Gatti (2 years ago)
Possibile visitarlo con la guida in occasione dell'apertura durante le giornate del FAI.
Adele S (2 years ago)
Ho visitato il castello in occasione delle giornate FAI, piccolo ma ricco di storia
Sergey Borodin (3 years ago)
Amazing
Alex Krstev (4 years ago)
Beautiful historic castle with delightfully daring wines and a wonderfully hospitable wine maker leading the charge. Definitely worth a visit!
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