Saint James's Church

Stockholm, Sweden

The origin of the Saint James's Church dates back to a chapel belonging to the Solna parish and at the time built on the outskirts of the parish. It is first mentioned in 1311. The present church, originally founded in the 16th century, took a long time to complete. As a consequence it includes a wide range of architectonic styles, such as Late Gothic,Renaissance and Baroque, the design of architects: Willem Boy (1580-1593), Hans Ferster (1635-1643), Göran Joshuae Adelcrantz and Carl Hårleman (1723-1735), Carl Möller and Agi Lindegren (1893-94).

The church is dedicated to apostle Saint James the Greater, patron saint of travellers. It is often mistakenly called St Jacob's. The confusion arises because Swedish, like many other languages, uses the same name for both James and Jacob.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mengshu Tang (2 years ago)
Beautiful Christmas concert
Johan Welin (2 years ago)
For anyone seeking Swedish church history and culture this venue is totally great. It is located in central Stockholm with superb communications. Take the subway to Kungsträdgården and walk less than 100 meters and you're there. Very, very much worth a visit. And there's a lot to experience in the surroundings. But those are other stories..:)
Oliver S (2 years ago)
Nice concerts
D.A. (2 years ago)
Simple yet beautiful church; great location as well in the centre of town and surrounded by a beautiful park.
Teo Gerald (3 years ago)
A beautiful church situated along park near seaside. I liked the strikingly orange red color which stands out amongst the surrounding. Inside the church, it has a beautiful organ and it's interior was well maintained. It's great for photo shooting due to its striking color.
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