Temple of Portunus

Rome, Italy

The Temple of Portunus or Temple of Fortuna Virilis ('manly fortune') is one of the best preserved of all Roman temples. Its dedication remains unclear, as ancient sources mention several temples in this area of Rome, without saying enough to make it clear which this is.

The temple was originally built in the third or fourth century BC but was rebuilt between 120-80 BC, the rectangular building consists of a tetrastyle portico and cella, raised on a high podium reached by a flight of steps, which it retains.

The temple owes its state of preservation to its being converted for use as a church in 872 and rededicated to Santa Maria Egyziaca (Saint Mary of Egypt). Its Ionic order has been much admired, drawn and engraved and copied since the 16th century. The original coating of stucco over its tufa and travertine construction has been lost.

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Details

Founded: 120-80 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luca Scia (19 months ago)
I love this place for the history of it. Portunus was a latin god. Specifically it was the wind who carried the ships safely to the harbour. The Romans believed that the wind should be celebrated because we have to imagine that the main items and products were carried by ships and a gentle and good wind helped to arrive safely. The english word OPPORTUNITY comes from Portunus because an opportunity is something good right?
Mary McPartland (20 months ago)
Beautiful spot across with few visitors, near Tiber River walk, from Boca. Take a few minutes to imagine Rome, 2000 years ago. Gorgeous sunny day in January.
Arturs Mons (21 months ago)
If you are on the way to mouth of truth it’s worth to pass by and see it. Otherwise don’t plan on purpose visit this attraction, there are plenty of other interesting sites in Rome to see.
Vladyslav Bugrym (2 years ago)
The Temple of Portunus (Italian: Tempio di Portuno) or Temple of Fortuna Virilis ("manly fortune") is a Roman temple in Rome, Italy, one of the best preserved of all Roman temples. Its dedication remains unclear, as ancient sources mention several temples in this area of Rome, without saying enough to make it clear which this is. It was called the Temple of Fortuna Virilis from the Renaissance, and remains better known by this name. If dedicated to Portunus, the god of keys, doors and livestock, and so granaries, it is the main temple dedicated to the god in the city.
Dave T (2 years ago)
One of the smallest but one of the best preserved temples in Rome originally built about 400 BC but rebuilt again around 100 BC. Also known as the temple of manly fortune.
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