Temple of Hercules Victor

Rome, Italy

The Temple of Hercules Victor is a monopteros, a round temple of Greek 'peripteral' design completely encircled by a colonnade. Dating from the later 2nd century BC, and perhaps erected by L. Mummius Achaicus, conqueror of the Achaeans and destroyer of Corinth, the temple is 14.8 m in diameter and consists of a circular cella within a concentric ring of twenty Corinthian columns. These elements supported an architrave and roof, which have disappeared. The original wall of the cella, built of travertine and marble blocks, and nineteen of the originally twenty columns remain but the current tile roof was added later. Palladio's published reconstruction suggested a dome, though this was apparently erroneous. The temple is the earliest surviving marble building in Rome.

By 1132 the temple had been converted to a church, known as Santo Stefano alle Carozze. Additional restorations (and a fresco over the altar) were made in 1475. A plaque in the floor was dedicated by Sixtus IV. In the 17th century the church was rededicated to Santa Maria del Sole.

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Founded: 200-100 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Luca Scia (2 years ago)
The temple Of Ercole Vincitore or Olivario is the temple dedicated to the guard of all business people and merchants. We don't have to forget that we are in a place where during the old Times the Romans used to exchange goods like olive oil, meat and other itemes. For the Romans there was a god for everyone and everything. ERCOLE Vincitor was the one of the Business.
Vladyslav Bugrym (3 years ago)
Piazza Bocca della Verità (Italian: Square of the Mouth of Truth) is a square between Via Luigi Petroselli and Via della Greca in Rome (Italy), in the rione Ripa. The square lies in the ancient area of the Forum Boarium, just in front of the Tiber Island; it takes its name from the Bocca della Verità (Italian: Mouth of Truth), placed under the portico of the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin. Besides the church, dating back to the late Middle Ages, the square houses the Arcus Argentariorum, the Arch of Janus, the Temple of Hercules Victor and the Temple of Portunus, a deity related to the ancient river harbour. Piazza Bocca della Verità: the Temple of Hercules Victor and the Temple of Portunus The fountain in front of the two temples, called Fountain of the Tritons, released by Carlo Bizzaccheri under commission of Pope Clement XI, was erected in the square in 1715 it has an octagonal basis and portrays two tritons supporting a shell from which the water springs. The square was the place where, until 1868, the sentences of death were executed.
Jean Seah (3 years ago)
Fascinating historical site dedicated to Hercules.
justinnelj (3 years ago)
I just walked by the temple, but it is beautiful during the day, or illuminated at night! If you walk by during the evening you can also peek in at the nearby "bocca della verita," inaccessible at night, but visible from beyond the barrier
aber105631 (3 years ago)
This is a really cool structure but getting inside would make it even better.
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