Temple of Hercules Victor

Rome, Italy

The Temple of Hercules Victor is a monopteros, a round temple of Greek 'peripteral' design completely encircled by a colonnade. Dating from the later 2nd century BC, and perhaps erected by L. Mummius Achaicus, conqueror of the Achaeans and destroyer of Corinth, the temple is 14.8 m in diameter and consists of a circular cella within a concentric ring of twenty Corinthian columns. These elements supported an architrave and roof, which have disappeared. The original wall of the cella, built of travertine and marble blocks, and nineteen of the originally twenty columns remain but the current tile roof was added later. Palladio's published reconstruction suggested a dome, though this was apparently erroneous. The temple is the earliest surviving marble building in Rome.

By 1132 the temple had been converted to a church, known as Santo Stefano alle Carozze. Additional restorations (and a fresco over the altar) were made in 1475. A plaque in the floor was dedicated by Sixtus IV. In the 17th century the church was rededicated to Santa Maria del Sole.

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Details

Founded: 200-100 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janos Kosa (4 years ago)
LOved this ancient building.
Karina (4 years ago)
Really nice place when we are walking near "la Bocca della Veritá"
John Bowman (4 years ago)
This is a really amazing piece of history. I believe it is the oldest standing template in standing temple in the city! Don't go at night because it will close.
V K (5 years ago)
These two temples are absolutely extraordinary. Each is a marvelous example of classical proportions. Exceptionally well preserved. According to legend, Romulus and Remus were raised in the marshes nearby or right in the spot. Hence that enormous Roman arena next door.
Wissam Abil Mouna (5 years ago)
One of the best preserved places from Ancient Roman era in the world
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