Santa Marta Church

Lecco, Italy

A church at the site of current Santa Marta was present by the 13th century, originally dedicated to St Calimero. In 1386, it housed the flagellant Confraternity of the Disciplini of St Marta, who added a hospice and rededicated the church. The church has been refurbished over the centuries. The facade dates to 1720–1730.

The interior ceiling has a late 17th-century fresco, depicting the Glory of St Martha, by Giovanni Battista and Carlo Pozzo, and the church houses a 17th-century processional statue on the main altar of the Madonna of the Rosary and Child. The altar has 16th century marble sculpture busts of the apostles; the altar was refurbished in 1816 likely by Giuseppe Bovara. The lateral altars have statues of Santa Marta and San Antonio di Padova.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabry Vj (7 months ago)
Una chiesetta molto bella. Inoltre la seconda domenica di ogni mese celebrano la messa in latino, molto suggestiva.
Tito Xhaferri (14 months ago)
   E’ uno storico appuntamento! La Messa ambrosiana tradizionale, in antico rito latino, torna ad essere celebrata a Lecco, nella chiesa di Santa Marta, in via Mascari, E’ la Messa che per quattro secoli ha innervato la liturgia della Chiesa, dopo lo storico Concilio di Trento della Riforma cattolica, argine alla Controriforma protestante di Martin Lutero. E una bellissima Chiesa
Antonella Ferr (2 years ago)
Semplice e bellissima Chiesa, in un vicolo a Lecco molto caratteristico.
Maurizio Marrazzo (4 years ago)
La più bella chiesa della città
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