Soave Castle

Soave, Italy

Soave castle was built in 934 to protect the area against the Hungarian invasions. It was remodelled by Cansignorio of the Scaliger family in the mid-1300s. in 1365 Cansignorio had the town walls erected and the Town hall was built in the same year.

The castle underwent various vicissitudes until, having lost its strategic importance, it was sold on the private market in 1596. In 1830 it was inherited by Giulio Camuzzoni who restored the manor and in particular the surroundings walls (with is twenty-four towers), the battlements and living-quarters.

Soave castle is a typical medieval military edifice, commanding the neighbourhood of the city from the Tenda Hill. It comprises a mastio (donjon) and three lines of walls forming three courts of different size. The outer line, with a gate and a draw bridge, is the most recent, built by the Venetians in the 15th century. It houses the remains of a small church from the 10th century.

The second and larger court, the first of the original castle, is called della Madonna for a fresco portraying St. Mary (1321). Another fresco is visible after the door leading to the inner court, and portrays a Scaliger soldier. The mastio is the most impressive feature of the castle. Bones found within showed it was used also as prison and place of torture.

The House called del Capitano (the Scaliger commander) houses Roman coins, weapons parts, medals and other ancient remains found during the most recent restoration. Adjacent is a bedroom with a 13th-century fresco with St. Mary and Madeleine and a dining room with medieval kitchenware. Another room houses the portraits of the most famous Scaliger figures: Mastino I, Cangrande, Cansignorio and Taddea da Carrara, wife of Mastino II; the portrait of Dante Alighieri testify an alleged sojourn of the poet in the castle.

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Address

Via Mondello 13, Soave, Italy
See all sites in Soave

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Mościcki (9 months ago)
Less tourists than in Padova. Great place to taste local wine.
G D F (9 months ago)
it's ok, nothing much. A bit pricey for what you get.
Melissa M. (10 months ago)
Worth a visit, spectacular view from the main tower
Slavko Kocijancic (10 months ago)
Well maintained castle. Not so very special from the inside. Pretty good view. Employees speak just a little English.
loretta polo (2 years ago)
Well worth the hike up from the centre of town (otherwise there is a car park that you can drive to). Make sure to join the custodian who gives a great explanation of what life was like for those living and working at the castle. Spectacular views of the surrounding vineyards especially from the tower.
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