Soave Castle

Soave, Italy

Soave castle was built in 934 to protect the area against the Hungarian invasions. It was remodelled by Cansignorio of the Scaliger family in the mid-1300s. in 1365 Cansignorio had the town walls erected and the Town hall was built in the same year.

The castle underwent various vicissitudes until, having lost its strategic importance, it was sold on the private market in 1596. In 1830 it was inherited by Giulio Camuzzoni who restored the manor and in particular the surroundings walls (with is twenty-four towers), the battlements and living-quarters.

Soave castle is a typical medieval military edifice, commanding the neighbourhood of the city from the Tenda Hill. It comprises a mastio (donjon) and three lines of walls forming three courts of different size. The outer line, with a gate and a draw bridge, is the most recent, built by the Venetians in the 15th century. It houses the remains of a small church from the 10th century.

The second and larger court, the first of the original castle, is called della Madonna for a fresco portraying St. Mary (1321). Another fresco is visible after the door leading to the inner court, and portrays a Scaliger soldier. The mastio is the most impressive feature of the castle. Bones found within showed it was used also as prison and place of torture.

The House called del Capitano (the Scaliger commander) houses Roman coins, weapons parts, medals and other ancient remains found during the most recent restoration. Adjacent is a bedroom with a 13th-century fresco with St. Mary and Madeleine and a dining room with medieval kitchenware. Another room houses the portraits of the most famous Scaliger figures: Mastino I, Cangrande, Cansignorio and Taddea da Carrara, wife of Mastino II; the portrait of Dante Alighieri testify an alleged sojourn of the poet in the castle.

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Address

Via Mondello 13, Soave, Italy
See all sites in Soave

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Fetters (18 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful and scenic town with so much to see and do. Definitely worth a visit in the Vicenza region.
John Carey (18 months ago)
You have to hand it to the Scaligere family. They shure did know where to build castles. The view is magnificent and the castle has been restored beautifully.
Bradley Hellberg (20 months ago)
A great little castle. Worth the trip to the top to get a view of the city and the surrounding landscape covered in vineyards. The amount of recorded history behind this castle is impressive. Only dislikes was that there is no pictures inside the small renovated interior portion. This is fairly typical though of European castles and churches. There is a bathroom inside the castle grounds but it's not marked. Stop by when in the area. You won't be disappointed!
D. John Grady (2 years ago)
Nice example of of Italian city castle. It's pretty well preserved, but not mobbed with tourists as much as other places.
Silvia (2 years ago)
Soave is a beautiful town and the castle is magnificent. The scenery is breath taking and makes the long walk very enjoyable. It is rich with history and really takes you back in time. It is fascinating for both children and adults. I deeply recommend to visit it at least once.
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