The Ponte Pietra (Italian for 'Stone Bridge'), is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River in Verona. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genoa to Aquileia passed over it. It is the oldest bridge in Verona.

It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala. Four arches of the bridge were blown up by retreating German troops in World War II, but rebuilt in 1957 with original materials.

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Ponte Pietra 21, Verona, Italy
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Founded: 100 BC
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Nastasa (18 months ago)
Very nice views from the bridge. I only wish i had a better weather.
Erika Rekke (19 months ago)
Amazing bridge with its surrounding area. Loved it!
Christina McBrayer (19 months ago)
A gorgeous view that anyone visiting should take the time to see! This spot was simply magical and well worth the walk just to take it all in, even in frigid January with two babies! I highly recommend a walk down the river to the bridge; it's easy to see how so many inspirational works of art have come from this place.
Grzegorz Per (19 months ago)
Shortest way between town centre and Roman Theatre / museum. On a nice day its very picturesque. Great views of Verona from nearby hill.
Jason Butcher (2 years ago)
As the oldest bridge in Verona being over 2000 years old it's worth going and walking over it. It was partially destroyed in WW2 but reconstructed with original materials. A beautiful spot to admire the city. Cafes and restaurants are close by and a few mins walk to the Old Roman Theatre
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