Ponte Pietra

Verona, Italy

The Ponte Pietra (Italian for 'Stone Bridge'), is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River in Verona. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genoa to Aquileia passed over it. It is the oldest bridge in Verona.

It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala. Four arches of the bridge were blown up by retreating German troops in World War II, but rebuilt in 1957 with original materials.

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Ponte Pietra 21, Verona, Italy
See all sites in Verona

Details

Founded: 100 BC
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wayne Bock (2 months ago)
Great spot from which to see the city and the river. Easy to get to and a good photo op.
Paul Citulski (2 months ago)
Great view and relaxing location overlooking the river through Verona. Grab a bite to eat at one of the many restaurants or have a refreshing drink.
Tomas Osvald (3 months ago)
Nothing special about this bridge, looks like any other one. But I have find smaller differences. There many people lock their padlock in shape of heart ❤️. Next time you will plan to visit this bridge in Verona , don’t forget to get one padlock heart shaped for you and you other half
Hakan ULUÇAY (4 months ago)
The Ponte Pietra (Italian for "Stone Bridge") is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River in Verona, Italy. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genoa to Aquileia passed over it. It is the oldest bridge in Verona. It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala. Four arches of the bridge were blown up by retreating German troops in World War II, but rebuilt in 1957 with original materials.
W. Jessie L (6 months ago)
Very very pretty! Come here a bit early in the morning to avoid the crowds. By 11am it was already full of tourists. Plan to spend at least one good hour to walk around and take photos.
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