Roman Theatre

Verona, Italy

The Roman theatre of Verona should not to be confused with the Roman amphitheatre known as the Verona Arena. The theatre was built in the late 1st century BC. Before its construction, two walls were built alongside the Adige River, between the Ponte di Pietra and the Ponte Postumio, to protect it against floods.

Today only remains of the edifice are visible, recovered starting from around 1830. They include the cavea and the steps, several arcades of the loggias and remains of the stage. Part of the cavea was occupied by the church of S. Siro, built in the 10th century and restored in the 14th century. At the top of the hill there was an ancient temple, built on a series of terraces.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Catherine Collopy (2 years ago)
This is a wonderful collection in a truly beautiful spot on the banks of the Adige. We had a splendid few hours exploring the exhibits
Mike Deeks (3 years ago)
Far bigger and wider selection than it appears. Very interesting how the theatre has grown and been added to / adjusted over time. The price is about what you'd expect. Discount for students. Lovely views into the city across the river. Worth a visit.
Zoltán Tóth-Pördi (3 years ago)
Great place to have some information about the ancient Verona together with a beautiful view to the city. I think the view is better than from Castello San Pietro. Good to know: On the first Sunday of every month, the entrance fee is only 1 EUR to everyone.
Andreas Offenhäuser (3 years ago)
Great view over Verona from the grand terrace. Even better than from St Peters because there is no treeline in the way. They have interesting exhibits ranging from 200BC to 700AD but sadly the instructions fail to give detailed information on the individual exhibits and their background. So it's good to see some relics but recommended to brush up on your history first.
Stephen M. Woodburn (3 years ago)
Worth the ticket price. Expect to climb steps and get a workout. The sculptures are mostly incomplete, but the beauty can still be appreciated. Also the church spaces housing the artifacts are worth noting. Some excellent sacred art on the walls.
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