Roman Theatre

Verona, Italy

The Roman theatre of Verona should not to be confused with the Roman amphitheatre known as the Verona Arena. The theatre was built in the late 1st century BC. Before its construction, two walls were built alongside the Adige River, between the Ponte di Pietra and the Ponte Postumio, to protect it against floods.

Today only remains of the edifice are visible, recovered starting from around 1830. They include the cavea and the steps, several arcades of the loggias and remains of the stage. Part of the cavea was occupied by the church of S. Siro, built in the 10th century and restored in the 14th century. At the top of the hill there was an ancient temple, built on a series of terraces.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reppeti (12 months ago)
Great place if you like Roman artifacts and such. Not ideal for all people.
Lisa B (12 months ago)
A very interesting historic place with a lot of archeological authentic pieces from the 1st century! Good place to visit when you are in Verona. You also get a beautiful view of the city. We enjoyed it very much
Paolo Trevisani (13 months ago)
A wonderful place ti see a beautiful show in a marvellous city
Peter Bentsen (13 months ago)
Great stuff and an absolute must see for lovers of roman art and curious people. The museum is much larger than we expected and the beautiful views over Ponte Pietra and Verona city from the top floors are an unexpected treat. Will forever be amazed over what these masters of art created over 2000 years ago.
Yamen Jairoudi (2 years ago)
Awesome
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