St Winefride's Well is a healing spring that has been visited by pilgrims for more than a thousand years. Known as the 'Lourdes of Wales', it is still probably the oldest continually visited pilgrimage site in Great Britain.

The healing waters have been said to cause miraculous cures. The legend of Saint Winifred tells how, in AD 660, Caradoc, the son of a local prince, severed the head of the young Winifred after she spurned his advances. A spring rose from the ground at the spot where her head fell and she was later restored to life by her uncle, Saint Beuno.

Richard I visited the site in 1189 to pray for the success of his crusade, and Henry V was said by Adam of Usk to have travelled there on foot from Shrewsbury in 1416.

In the late 15th century, Lady Margaret Beaufort had built a chapel overlooking the well, which now opens onto a pool where visitors may bathe. Some of the structures at the well date from the reign of King Henry VII or earlier. Later, King Henry VIII caused the shrine and saintly relics to be destroyed, but some have been recovered to be housed at Shrewsbury and Holywell.

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Founded: c. 660 AD
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justin Fisher (3 years ago)
Beautiful place has to be seen
chris randall (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit, very tranquil, the lady who was working in the visitor center was exceptionally polite upon arrival, would recommend a visit!
David & Sylvia Wright (4 years ago)
Worth the time spent visiting. This is an active place of religious worship. The story of Winifred is fascinating.
Winifred Oliobi (4 years ago)
It is a very holy calm place. The staff were very friendly with excellent customer services. The sisters in the convent were amazing and the accommodation was excellent. I visited August 2017 with my prayer intentions and I am extremely happy to say that all my prayer were answered within one year of this visit. I am encouraging anyone who have specific issue of concern to visit with faith. I will be visiting every year as much as possible. It is worth going. To God be Glory and honour to my beautiful patron saint Winifred. St Winifred, Pray for us.
pj smith (4 years ago)
Nice and peaceful,pity the gypos had been there and scrawled graffiti all over it. Nice historical place to visit. Very cheap admission too.
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