Lower Saxony State Museum

Hanover, Germany

The Lower Saxony State Museum comprises the State Gallery (Landesgalerie), featuring paintings and sculptures from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, plus departments of archaeology, natural history and ethnology. The museum includes a vivarium with fish, amphibians, reptiles and arthropods. 

The predecessor of museum ran out of space for its art collections, prompting the construction of the current building, on the edge of the Maschpark, in 1902. It was designed by Hubert Stier in a Neo-Renaissance style. The cupola above the central risalit was destroyed by Allied bombs during the war. Extensive renovations and modernisations were carried out in the building's interior from 1995 to 2000.

The State Gallery features art from the 11th to the 20th centuries. The collection includes German and Italian works from the Renaissance and the Baroque, 17th-century Flemish and Dutch paintings, Danish paintings from the 19th and 20th centuries (e.g. Constantin Hansen), and a print room featuring old German masters, Dutch drawings, 19th-century printworks, and drawings by German Impressionists. Some of the best-known artists include Rembrandt, Rubens and Albrecht Dürer.

The gallery's other strengths include German and French Impressionist paintings, works by Max Liebermann, Lovis Corinth and Max Slevogt, and major works from members of the Künstlerkolonie Worpswede group, such as Bernhard Hoetger, Fritz Overbeck, Otto Modersohn and Paula Modersohn-Becker. Caspar David Friedrich's four-piece Tageszeitenzyklus (The Times of Day) is the only complete such series by Friedrich in a single museum.

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Details

Founded: 1902
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Azul Ogazon (19 months ago)
Good museum to visit, just wished that they have the exhibitions information in English as well.
Rob Peters (19 months ago)
A very nice cultural experience today at the Landesmuseum Hannover Germany. Man over the ages has not changed. Woman are respected today as they were not in the past. The art exhibited demonstrated a need for all humans be responsible, mindful, kind, and respectful to each other.
Damir Garaev (19 months ago)
A great place to go with kids on a family weekend. Living fish, losts of historical iteams. 2-3 hours of learning for children. Location is good. Nor far from the city center.
Mark Fishwick (20 months ago)
Great place, spent a nice Sunday here. The exhibition specifically wanted to see was better than expected. And on the ground floor they have an exhibition of the evolution of the earth and animals, which was equally fasanating. All the children in there were full of awe. So can only suggest a visit, took some photos of the aquariums WITHOUT THE FLASH!!! And a few of the Artworks. There's also a small but good café for a break, can recommend the food and beverages.
P K (21 months ago)
Interesting museum with aquatics and extensive art exhibition. Has a good cafe as well.
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