Balquhain Castle

Pitcaple, United Kingdom

Balquhain Castle is a ruined tower house in Aberdeenshire. It was built in the 14th century and held by Leslie family from 1340. On 5 July 1441 John Leslie of Balquhain made an indenture with four masons, David Hardgat, David Dun, Robert Masoun and Gilbert Masoun that they would complete his building work.

The castle was sacked during a feud with the Forbes family in 1526. The castle was rebuilt in 1530. Mary Queen of Scots in 1562 stayed at the castle prior to the Battle of Corrichie. It was burned by the forces of Prince William, Duke of Cumberland in 1746 and was abandoned.

The tower measures 13.75 by 8.75 metres, and is surrounded by the remains of a barmkin.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Darren Findlay (2 years ago)
Historic and scenic.
Nikki McKinnell (2 years ago)
Bit of a walk through nettles to get to it so please wear trousers and gloves because I'm covered in stings ?
Alexander Simpson (3 years ago)
Quite remote and not easy to get to.
Garry Douglas (5 years ago)
I grew up here and castles always fascinate me, do its a 5 star review ?
Mark Jordan (5 years ago)
Next door to my friends house
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wieskirche

The Pilgrimage Church of Wies (Wieskirche) is an oval rococo church, designed in the late 1740s by Dominikus Zimmermann. It is located in the foothills of the Alps in the municipality of Steingaden.

The sanctuary of Wies is a pilgrimage church extraordinarily well-preserved in the beautiful setting of an Alpine valley, and is a perfect masterpiece of Rococo art and creative genius, as well as an exceptional testimony to a civilization that has disappeared.

The hamlet of Wies, in 1738, is said to have been the setting of a miracle in which tears were seen on a simple wooden figure of Christ mounted on a column that was no longer venerated by the Premonstratensian monks of the Abbey. A wooden chapel constructed in the fields housed the miraculous statue for some time. However, pilgrims from Germany, Austria, Bohemia, and even Italy became so numerous that the Abbot of the Premonstratensians of Steingaden decided to construct a splendid sanctuary.