Corgarff Castle is located at Corgarff, in Aberdeenshire. The castle was built in the mid-16th century by the Forbes of Towie. In 1571 it was burned by their enemy, Adam Gordon of Auchindoun, resulting in the deaths of Lady Forbes, her children, and numerous others, and giving rise to the ballad Edom o Gordon. After the Jacobite risings of the 18th century, it was rebuilt as a barracks and a detachment of government troops were stationed there, on the military road from Braemar Castleto Fort George, Inverness.

Military use continued as late as 1831, after which the tower served as a distillery and housed local workers. It remained part of the Delnadamph estate belonging to the Stockdale family until they passed the castle into state care in 1961 and gave the ownership of the castle to the Lonach Highland and Friendly Society. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland and is open to the public.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Aslam Uddin (13 months ago)
good place to go
Aslam Uddin (13 months ago)
good place to go
Koen (18 months ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Koen (18 months ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Alan Fraser (20 months ago)
Tucked away at Donside just off the Cockbridge - Tomintoul road and well worth a visit.
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