Corgarff Castle is located at Corgarff, in Aberdeenshire. The castle was built in the mid-16th century by the Forbes of Towie. In 1571 it was burned by their enemy, Adam Gordon of Auchindoun, resulting in the deaths of Lady Forbes, her children, and numerous others, and giving rise to the ballad Edom o Gordon. After the Jacobite risings of the 18th century, it was rebuilt as a barracks and a detachment of government troops were stationed there, on the military road from Braemar Castleto Fort George, Inverness.

Military use continued as late as 1831, after which the tower served as a distillery and housed local workers. It remained part of the Delnadamph estate belonging to the Stockdale family until they passed the castle into state care in 1961 and gave the ownership of the castle to the Lonach Highland and Friendly Society. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland and is open to the public.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kathrine Wilson (17 months ago)
Wasn't open when I was visiting but was a nice morning walk with the dogs
Victoria Allen (18 months ago)
Beautiful building in a lovely setting
Michael Jefferson (2 years ago)
Been passing this for years and finally visited. Interesting history and well preserved. A few floors to climb and beautiful wild location. Recommended if in the area.
Robert Murray (2 years ago)
Views to die for. This castle has been renovated to a great standard. The road from tomintoul to here is amazing.
Shona Norman (2 years ago)
Nice castle with shop but no toilets. The reconstructed redcoat barrack room is interesting and if you go up to the top floor you can dress up in period costumes to take your tour.
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