Corgarff Castle is located at Corgarff, in Aberdeenshire. The castle was built in the mid-16th century by the Forbes of Towie. In 1571 it was burned by their enemy, Adam Gordon of Auchindoun, resulting in the deaths of Lady Forbes, her children, and numerous others, and giving rise to the ballad Edom o Gordon. After the Jacobite risings of the 18th century, it was rebuilt as a barracks and a detachment of government troops were stationed there, on the military road from Braemar Castleto Fort George, Inverness.

Military use continued as late as 1831, after which the tower served as a distillery and housed local workers. It remained part of the Delnadamph estate belonging to the Stockdale family until they passed the castle into state care in 1961 and gave the ownership of the castle to the Lonach Highland and Friendly Society. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland and is open to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aslam Uddin (8 months ago)
good place to go
Aslam Uddin (8 months ago)
good place to go
Koen (13 months ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Koen (13 months ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Alan Fraser (15 months ago)
Tucked away at Donside just off the Cockbridge - Tomintoul road and well worth a visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.