Corgarff Castle is located at Corgarff, in Aberdeenshire. The castle was built in the mid-16th century by the Forbes of Towie. In 1571 it was burned by their enemy, Adam Gordon of Auchindoun, resulting in the deaths of Lady Forbes, her children, and numerous others, and giving rise to the ballad Edom o Gordon. After the Jacobite risings of the 18th century, it was rebuilt as a barracks and a detachment of government troops were stationed there, on the military road from Braemar Castleto Fort George, Inverness.

Military use continued as late as 1831, after which the tower served as a distillery and housed local workers. It remained part of the Delnadamph estate belonging to the Stockdale family until they passed the castle into state care in 1961 and gave the ownership of the castle to the Lonach Highland and Friendly Society. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland and is open to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aslam Uddin (3 years ago)
good place to go
Aslam Uddin (3 years ago)
good place to go
Koen (3 years ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Koen (3 years ago)
An educational castle at a magnificent location! Corgarff Castle was built sometime in the mid-16th century by the 3rd Lord Elphinstone (or by his vassal John Forbes of Towrie). The little castle, in fact not much more than the 15 meter high residential tower with a star-shaped wall around it, has, partly due to the Jacobite Revolts, a turbulent history of conquests and arson. In 1748, a garrison of the government army is stationed in Corgarff Castle in their struggle to pacify the Highlands. After 1802 the castle lost its military function, except for the short period 1827-1831 when a garrison was stationed in the hunt for illegal whiskey distilleries. The castle fell into disrepair and after 1912 it is no longer inhabited. In 1961 Sir Edmund and Lady Stockdale donated the ruin to the state, which had it restored in its 18th century style. Located on the border between meadows and heaths, a visit to Corgarff Castle is an educational experience well worth your while.
Alan Fraser (3 years ago)
Tucked away at Donside just off the Cockbridge - Tomintoul road and well worth a visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

La Iruela Castle

The castle of La Iruela, small but astonishing, is located on the top of a steep crag in Sierra de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas Natural Park. From the castle, impressive views of the surrounding area and of the town can be enjoyed.

The keep dates from the Christian era. It has a square base and small dimensions and is located at the highest part of the crag.

There are some other enclosures within the tower that create a small alcázar which is difficult to access.

In a lower area of the castle, protected with defensive remains of rammed earth and irregular masonry, is an old Muslim farmstead.

After a recent restoration, an open-air theater has been built on La Iruela castle enclosure. This theater is a tribute to the Greek and Classic Eras and holds various artistic and cultural shows throughout the year.

History

The first traces of human activity in La Iruela area are dated from the Copper Age. An intense occupation continued until the Bronze Age.

Originally, La Iruela (like Cazorla) was a modest farmstead. From the 11th century, a wall and a small fortress were built on the hill to protect the farmers.

Around 1231, don Rodrigo Ximénez de Rada, Archbishop of Toledo, conquered La Iruela and made it part of the Adelantamiento de Cazorla. Over the Muslim fortress, the current fortress was built.

Once the military use of the fortress ended, it was used as cemetery.