Dunnideer Castle Ruins

Insch, United Kingdom

Dunnideer Castle, now ruined, was a tower house located near Insch, Aberdeenshire. It was built c. 1260 partially from the remains of an existing vitrified hill fort in the same location. It consisted of a single rectangular tower of 15m by 12.5m with walls 1.9m thick. Evidence suggests that a first-floor hall existed. Evidence shows it had several floors.

The tower house is built within an older prehistoric vitrified hillfort dating to c. 250 BC. The prehistoric fort and tower house is a scheduled monument.

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Details

Founded: c. 1260
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Middleton (18 months ago)
Nice brisk taxing walk up the hill
Derek Coull (18 months ago)
Iconic Aberdeenshire Landmark. Iron age fort ruin at the summit which makes an exciting adventure for kids of 5 + Great views in all directions. Perfect for a sunday wander, take a picnic fly a kite or photograph the surrounding Aberdeenshire skyline. This is also a great aurora viewing spot although can be brutally cold in winter months due the wind chill factor....wrap up warm for a night walk and make sure you have a torch. The walk albeit short is particularly steep in places with underfoot conditions requiring caution due to rabbit holes / mud & frost ice in winter months.
Marc Shand (2 years ago)
Great views. Only a short walk to the top
Chris Bates (2 years ago)
A beautiful and scenic castle from the 13th century. One of only a few Vitrified forts still standing.
Paul Kelly (3 years ago)
Nice short walk, although very steep in places and limited parking.
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