Monastery of Iviron is an Eastern Orthodox monastery in the monastic state of Mount Athos in northern Greece. The monastery was built under the supervision of two Georgian monks, John the Iberian and Tornike Eristavi between 980-983 and housed Georgian clergy and priests. Iviron literally means 'of the Iberians' in Greek. The name Iviron originated from the ancient Georgian Kingdom of Iberia (Iveria) where the master architect of the monastery Ioannes was from.

The monastery ranks third in the hierarchy of the Athonite monasteries. The monastery library contains 2,000 manuscripts, 15 liturgical scrolls, and 20,000 books in Georgian, Greek, Hebrew, and Latin.

The monastery has the relics of more canonized saints than any other on Mount Athos. The Panagia Portaitissa, a famous 9th century icon, is also located at Iviron.

The monastery has about 30 working monks and novices, none of whom are Georgian. However, there are forty or so Georgian hermits living in hermitages near the monastery.

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Mount Athos, Greece
See all sites in Mount Athos

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Founded: 980-983 AD
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George Kontogouris (2 years ago)
The Monsatery of Iviron is located on the east side of the Peninsula just next to the sea. In the center of the Monastery lies the church founded in the 10th century. The Monastery is well known for the feast on the 15th of August – day of the dormition of the Virgin. There is a huge feast and many pilgrims visit the Monastery for the picture of Panaghia Portaitissa.
Florin Pangratiu (2 years ago)
Very nice monastery.
Radu Costianu (2 years ago)
Amazing, one of the most beautiful Monasteries in Athos, I always enjoy going there. You can also reach it by going down from Larry's, through the forest. It's one hoour-1 hour and a half walking. Through the forest. You only need to be careful not to miss the path.
Ilie Grecu (3 years ago)
Perfect place , but you can't stay over night without reservation
Francis L Mayer (3 years ago)
Very spiritual and friendly monastery on Mount Athos with a rich history spanning for well over a thousand years.
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