Hilandar Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

Hilandar Monastery is the northern most monastery located on the northeast side of the Athos Peninsula. The monastery was founded in 1198 by saints Sava and Simeon. The Monastery has been supported and populated by Serbian monkssince then. It is ranked fourth in the hierarchical order of the twenty monasteries located on the Mount Athos peninsula.

After forming the Serbian state Stephen Nemanja, the Grand Župan of Serbia, in the Council of Ras in 1196 established the basis for smooth successions of power within the state. He, then, abdicated in favor of his middle son Stefan and proceeded to pursue a life of spirituality and pray as the monk Simeon. He joined his youngest son, Rastko, who earlier had taken the monastic name of Sava and lived on Mount Athos. With the approval of the Emperor Alexius III Angelicus, who in his chrysobull of 1198 declared Hilandar as an independent monastery dedicated to the Serbians, the father and son began restoring the ruins of the old monastery as the foundation of the present day community.

Hilandar became the spiritual and religious center for the Serbs. In 1430, the Holy Mountain of Athos was occupied by the Ottoman Turks. While the Turks did not interfere with the autonomy of the monastic communities the monks were affected by the lost of income from their estates that had been taken by the occupying Turks. Thus, their survival became difficult under the new overlords. The monastery remained a symbol of Serbian culture and religious continuity and was endowed by Serbian rulers through the centuries.

Whereas most of the monastic communities on Mount Athos are built on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, Hilandar is located a few kilometers in land. The complex includes within its protective walls a katholikon and a number of small chapels, as well as cells for the monks, guest quarters, a library, treasury, and a hospital.

On March 4, 2004, a major fire sweeps through the monastery that destroyed about half the structures in the monastery. The medieval heirlooms and relics that made up the treasures of the monastery were moved to safety, but major damage was done to the abbot's cell and guest rooms as well as four chapels with the 17th and 18th century frescoes. Restoration of the damage is on going.

The monastery possesses over 1,000 thirteenth- to eighteenth-century Byzantine and Serbian icons as well as sacred objects, various artifacts, and historical documents. Many of these dated from the thirteenth century. The library contains a collection of books and some 1,000 manuscripts including Cyrillic manuscripts and the first printed books in Serbian. The library also holds many books in Russian, Bulgarian, and Greek.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Details

Founded: 1198
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrey Vinnitskiy (16 months ago)
This is very spiritual and welcoming place (even for one who don't speak Serbian). Pilgrims facilities are well maintained and very clean Also a good place to visit the neighbored monasteries on foot
Zeljko Savic (17 months ago)
Beautiful historical place, Serbian monastery on Mount Athos
Mike (19 months ago)
1000 years old place! Serbian Orthodox monastery in Greece ☦ Built by Stefan Nemanja and his Son Rastko Nemanjic- Saint Sava Serbian ☦?? Orthodox brothers!
Smiljan & Sonja Spasojevic (23 months ago)
Unbelievable monastery! Place where God touches His children’s hearts directly. It is holy in every sense. Never seen monks so devoted! I felt free of societal distractions and faults, truly. Felt such peace and calamity. The immense historical importance of this monastery and all peninsula is felt from the first step in this holy ground. Would go and visit any day! God bless the monastery and it’s monks and priests!
Branko Bozanic (2 years ago)
No need to explain why is it most beautiful place that I ever been. Please don't miss
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