Simonopetra Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

Simonopetra Monastery is an Eastern Orthodox monastery in the monastic state of Mount Athos. Simonopetra ranks thirteenth in the hierarchy of the Athonite monasteries. The monastery is located in the southern coast of the Athos peninsula. While the southern coast of Athos is quite rugged in general, the particular site upon which the monastery is built is exceptionally harsh. It is built on top of a single huge rock, practically hanging from a cliff 330 metres over the sea.

The monastery was founded during the 13th century by Simon the Athonite, who was later sanctified by the Eastern Orthodox Church as Osios Simon the Myrrohovletes. Tradition holds that Simon, while dwelling in a nearby cave, saw a dream in which the Theotokos instructed him to build a monastery on top of the rock, promising him that she would protect and provide for him and the monastery. In 1364, the Serbian despot Jovan Uglješa funded the renovation and expansion of the monastery.

In 1581, Simonopetra was destroyed by a fire, in which a large portion of the monks died. Evgenios, the monastery's abbot traveled to the Danubian Principalities hoping to raise funds to rebuild the monastery. The most important donor was Michael the Brave, Prince of Wallachia, who donated large portions of land as well as money to the monastery. The monastery was also burnt in 1626, and the last great fire happened in 1891, after which the monastery was rebuilt to its current form.

During recent centuries, the monks of the monastery were traditionally from Ionia in Asia Minor. However, during the mid-20th century the brotherhood was greatly thinned out because of a great reduction in the influx of new monks. The current brotherhood originates from the Holy Monastery of Great Meteoron in Meteora as in 1973 the Athonite community headed by Archimandrite Emilianos decided to repopulate the almost abandoned monastery.

The monastery consists of several multi-storeyed buildings, the main being in the place of the original structure, built by Simon. The monks of Simonopetra traditionally count the floors from top to bottom, thus the top floor is the first floor and the bottom floor the last. The monastery is built on top of the underlying massive rock, and the rock runs through the lower floors.

The expansion and development of Simon's original structure almost always followed one of the monastery's great fires. Following the 1580 fire and with the funds gathered by abbot Evgenios, the western building was erected. The eastern building was built following the 1891 fire mostly with funds raised in Russia.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George Kontogouris (2 years ago)
Probably the Monastery with the best views. It seats on a rock 200+ meters above the sea. You seat in the veranda and in front of you lies the Aegean sea and on your left the peak of Mount Athos. What is more to ask? Totally a must visit when in Holly Mountain. Very recently renovated
Dmytro Nagorniak (2 years ago)
Simonopetra Monastery Mount Athos in Greece
Panagiotis Maragelis (3 years ago)
God help us.
Madhu Menon (5 years ago)
Simonopetra Monastery is heaven on Earth. A spiritual journey towards God. One can learn life can be so simple and beautiful, and many more.
Devansh Cholera (6 years ago)
Come here to feel the power, peace and beauty of Greece and Hellenia
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