Räpplinge Church

Borgholm, Öland, Sweden

Räpplinge church was originally built in the middle of the 12th century, but rebuilt and widened as late as 1802. The votive ship in Räpplinge church is the most authentic in the churches of Öland. It date back to the middle of the 17th century and surprisingly well preserved even though it has demonstrably been in the church since 1692. The model is of a three-masted naval ship with 42 cannons on the gun deck. It is without sail, but has all the contemporary sculptural adornments. The altarpiece and pulpit were made by Jonas Berggren.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1150
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.maritimeatlas.eu

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Annelie Sigfridsson (2 years ago)
Nice church to be in when needed
Ingela Ivarsson (2 years ago)
Räpplinge church is richly decorated. The grandstand barrier has several colorful pictures in different sizes with biblical motifs. What is striking about the church is that many of the decorations are so colorful. The church is very worth seeing.
sabine stoltze (3 years ago)
Nice imposing church
Krister Amner (4 years ago)
Very nice place
Lars-Göran Holgersson (4 years ago)
Looked nice
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