At Skäftekärr you willl find an Iron Age village, where you can see the excavated foundations of twenty two houses. There is a full-scale reconstruction of an Iron Age House, where visitors can get a real sense of how people lived about fifteen hundred years ago. There are signposted walks and trails in the area. You’ll also find a beautiful landscaped park with an arboretum containing 140 types of tree. There is a children’s playground, a cafe and restaurant here.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

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www.skaftekarr.se

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Runar Severinsen (2 years ago)
Artig å se. God forklaring på hva du ser.
Olof Hervieu (2 years ago)
A journey to the past in a beautiful environment. Your kids will enjoy it too.
Johan Rebensdorff (2 years ago)
Spännande för vetgiriga barn (och vuxna). Med guidade turer kommer parken till liv. Så tajma besöket mot turerna. Även fiket håller väldigt hög standard och värt ett besök enbart i sig.
Magnus Bjursell (2 years ago)
The coffee place is really nice, but the iron age village is a bit too expensive although very interesting...
Kjetil Gamst (2 years ago)
Ut å gå i skogen. Flink guide, klarte å engasjere barna. Fin historie.
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