Hasistejn Castle

Chomutov, Czech Republic

Hasištejn (Burg Hassenstein) is a ruined medieval castle situated near Kadaň, Klášterec nad Ohří and Chomutov. The castle, first mentioned in Maiestas Carolina, was probably founded by Friedrich of Schönburg to guard the way from Prague to Saxony. The castle was seized by Václav IV of Luxembourg in the early 15th century and given to Nicholas of Lobkowicz.

The most renowned inhabitant of the castle was Bohuslav Hasištejnský z Lobkovic, a poet and traveller who was born in Hassenstein and lived there permanently from 1503 to his death in 1510. He gathered a huge library (comprising more than 650 volumes) in the castle, resulting in many scholars and humanists visiting Hasištejn Castle to borrow his books. Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon were among his visitors.

After Bohuslav's death in 1510, Hasištejn Castle began to fall into disrepair, which was exacerbated when it caught fire in 1560. Although the castle is now a ruin, its tower and walls remain standing to this day. While the castle became state property during the Communist regime, it was returned to the Lobkowicz family after 1989.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

cs.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gabriela Havrankova (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to see offering nice views of far away places
Vehicle for fun, testing. (2 years ago)
Interesting old castle that you can walk inside a tower thats very old??
Travel Pa More! (3 years ago)
Very nice view.accessible by car and child friendly place to visit. Unfortunately it's close when we went there so we are not able to see what's inside.
voši jirka (3 years ago)
Super
Marie Panhnsova (3 years ago)
Super
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