Perched atop its cliff where the Ploučnice meets the Elbe, Děčín Castle is one of the oldest and largest landmarks in northern Bohemia. In the past several hundred years it has served as a point of control for the Bohemian princes, a military fortress, and noble estate.

The forerunner of the Děčín Castle was a wooden fortress built towards the end of the 10th century by the Bohemian princes. The first written record of the province dates from 993 A.D. and of the fortress itself from 1128. In the thirteenth century it was rebuilt in stone as a royal castle that, under unknown circumstances, fell into the hands of the powerful Wartenberg dynasty around 1305.

Numerous later renovations has erased all but fragments of the original medieval semblance of the castle. A significant change to the castle came in the second half of the 16th century when it was held by the Saxon Knights of Bünau, who gradually rebuilt the lower castle into a Renaissance palace with a grand ceremonial hall. The current semblance of the castle is the work of the Thun-Hohensteins, who held the Děčín lands from 1628 to 1932. The Thuns originally came from southern Tyrol and gradually worked their way to the upper echelons of Hapsburg society where they regularly filled important political and church appointments.

The Thuns reworked the castle twice. The first reconstruction, in the Baroque style, was undertaken by Maximilian von Thun, Imperial envoy and diplomat, and was meant to enhance the ceremonial aspects of the property. A central element of the project was a grand access road, the Long Drive, ending in the upper gate of the completely rebuilt entry wing. Along the drive stretched an ornamental garden (today known as the Rose Garden) and a riding yard. Maximilian’s brother Johann Ernst von Thun was responsible for the erection of the Church of the Ascension of the Holy Cross in the town below.

The second and final reconstruction of the castle was undertaken in 1786–1803. The Gothic and Renaissance palaces were torn down, all structures were leveled to the same height and gave them a unified facade. On the riverfront the castle's new dominant feature arose, a slender clock tower. Thus the castle took on the Baroque-Classical style we see today.

In the course of the 19th century, the castle became an important cultural and political center. In the 20th century the castle was used as a military garrison for German and Soviet troops after being handed to the Czechoslovak state in 1932. In 1991 the castle reverted to the ownership of the city of Děčín and the gradual renovation of the devastated structure began.

The eastern wing serves as a branch of the Děčín Regional Museum. The northern wing is occupied by the State District Archives. The staterooms of the western wing welcome individual and group tours, weddings, concerts, exhibits, and other cultural events. The castle courtyard comes to life throughout the year with events ranging from the Historic May Fair to the Wine Festival in September.

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Details

Founded: 993 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

www.zamekdecin.cz

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Akshay Babu (3 months ago)
It is a very nice view from the castle
Aneta Toboříková (5 months ago)
The castle is lovely. You get to learn quite a bit about the places history. The tour guide was a bit insecure but in general very nice person and she relaxed during the tour.
David Vrbský (5 months ago)
Nice spot at heart of Decin.You should to try pancakes in castles area. By visiting them you can get not only very tasty food, but you also support project, which employs people with variant handicap.
Anna Karlińska (5 months ago)
A beautiful castle worth visiting. I visited it in January so the gardens were closed (therefore I can’t mark them). The castle is really impressive, big and you will spend there at least an hour to see everything. There is also a nice cafeteria with drinks and food. We didn’t have a tour guide but the audiobooks in our language. Not sure whether you can book a tour with a guide but with the audiobook you get quite a lot of information too.
Liz Phillips (10 months ago)
Lovely area with Elbe river flowing past. Lots of good/bad history involved with the castle. Very cheap to look around, but it needs a bit of money spent on sweeping the stairs and general tidy up.
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