St. Stephen's Cathedral

Litoměřice, Czech Republic

The St. Stephen's Cathedral is one of the most important cultural sites in the city. It is protected as a cultural monument of the Czech Republic.

Located on a hill in the place of an older church (originally a basilica) The temple was built in Romanesque style in 1057 and rebuilt in the 14th century in the Gothic style. In the presbytery is a large altar dedicated to St. Stephen, patron of the cathedral.

In the years 1662 to 1663 the original building was destroyed and in the years 1663-70 present cathedral was erected. The cathedral was consecrated in 1681. Today's cathedral tower replaced wooden baroque belfry in the years 1883-89.

There have been various modifications and repairs especially in 1716, 1778, 1825 and 1892.

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Details

Founded: 1663
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

More Information

www.czech.cz
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vlastimil Polak (2 years ago)
It’s a really nice and calm place with a historical spirit
christian verzè (2 years ago)
Wonderful church in a wonderful square in a typical bohemian Baroc style
Mario Falzon (3 years ago)
Litomerice boasts two historical quarters. Mirove namesti, surrounded by colourful burghers’ houses is the centre of leisure activity. Lined on its south edge with parasol-shaded outdoor spaces set up by restaurant owners as a means of supplementing their indoor capacity, it is perhaps the only place in Litomerice where one can while the time away in leisurely pursuits. Cut off from the rest of the city and perched high on a hill top is the city’s second historical quarter. Unlike Mirove namesti, this is a people-less place of quietness and seclusion, a vast green square where the sole twin points of attraction are the massive Cathedral of St Stephen and its lofty freestanding bell tower. Known as Domsky Pahorek, this parkland of trees and turf is located on the isolated southwest periphery of the city centre, overlooking the River Elbe. The cathedral, intricately balanced on one corner of this grassy slope is a redesigned 17th-century version of an older original. This vast baroque structure and the additional complementary stonework ornaments on its exterior are both impressive. But go inside and you are faced with an austere gloomy space that instantaneously disappoints. The only relief is the set of chiaroscuro altarpieces from the school of Cranach the Elder. The imposing bell tower (opening times for visitors are the same as for the cathedral), constructed two centuries later stands some 10m away. Climb up the tower for a spectacular view over the city of Litomerice and the hillside area to the north. A sloping cobbled alleyway runs down along the north side of the cathedral (from here, the side views of the cathedral are superb) to the bottom of Domsky Pahorek. One of the modest houses you run into on the way is the former residence of the Czech poet Karel Hynek Macha. The flight of steps at the foot of the hill, aptly named Machovy Schody, connects to Mirove namesti.
Kelvin Eagleton (3 years ago)
We only climbed the tower to see the city. It was an easy walk up stairs (202 steps). Views are good at 3 directions only. Litoměřice and surrounding area is very nice city from up here.
Pavel Bílek (4 years ago)
Za to kilo to stojí ;)
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