Olšany Cemeteries is the largest graveyard in Prague, once having as many as two million burials. The graveyard is particularly noted for its many remarkable art nouveau monuments.

The cemeteries were created in 1680 to accommodate plague victims who died en masse in Prague and needed to be buried quickly. In 1787, when the plague again struck the city, Emperor Joseph II banned the burial of bodies within Prague city limits and Olšany Cemeteries were declared the central graveyard for hygiene purposes.

The Olšany necropolis consists of twelve cemeteries, including, i.a., an Orthodox and a tiny Muslim section, the largest Jewish cemetery in the Czech Republic and military burial grounds. Among the thousands of military personnel buried at Olšany, there are Russian soldiers and officers from the Napoleonic Wars, members of the Czechoslovak Legion, Czechoslovak soldiers, officers and pilots who fought at the Eastern and Western Front and in North Africa during the Second World War as well as male and female members of the Soviet and Commonwealth (including British, Canadian, South African, Greek and Turkish Cypriot and Polish) armed forces who died for the freedom of Czechoslovakia in 1944-1945, including POWs.

Till this day there is evidence of 230,000 people buried, 65,000 grave sites, 200 chapel graves and six columbariums in Olšany Cemeteries.

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User Reviews

Chris Howson (18 months ago)
After nearly a week in Prague, we were running out of things to do. As the wife and I like cemeteries, we decided to pay a visit here. It was a short ride on the Metro, and practically right outside the Metro station. Its huge. We spent about 4 hours wandering around, and it was so peaceful. Its a proper oldy worldy cemetery, with loads of interesting mausoleums, and gravestones to read. Lots of places to sit and eat lunch too. We visited Kafka's grave, and also found Russian and British war graves there too. Highly recommended if you want to escape city centre Prague.
Andrea Gargiani (19 months ago)
Its origins date back to 1680, when it was used during a plague epidemic, but its definitive valorization is due to Giuseppe II, who with a decree forbade, for hygienic reasons, that the dead were buried around the city churches. divides into 12 cemeteries, also distinguished by religion. In addition to the Hebrew one, which we will discuss later, there is a section for the burial of Orthodox Christians and another for Muslims. There is also the cemetery of Red Army soldiers who fell during the war in Czechoslovakia. The monumental tombs that are inside it are numerous and of great value, among which those in art nouveau style stand out. Olšany also has two large structures for the celebration of funeral rites.
Lukas Dusek (21 months ago)
Nejkrásnější lesopark v centru města. / The best forest park central Prague has. Perfect place for lovely walks in green surroundings - if you don't mind "sepulchral factor" :-)
Jon Poulin (2 years ago)
This cemetery is beautiful. I visited when there were leaves on the grounds. Seeing all the growth of the plants and the varied headstones, it was a wonderful to walk through. You can see headstones meticulously taken care of, others, overgrown or broken. I never thought I would enjoy a cemetery this much. The pictures speak for themselves.
Ieva Keruka (2 years ago)
Fantastic place to visit to get away from the annoying crowds. It is a very serene and calm place, you will find beautiful (if somewhat decayed) sculptures and gravestones, memorial for victims of war and plenty of little secret corners you may accidentally stumble upon and find something truly astonishing. This is a working cemetery so be aware that you may run into an actual funeral procession. Take note of the opening hours, the gates will be closed in the evening.
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