Château de Coupiac

Coupiac, France

Dating from the 15th century, Château de Coupiac is formed by two T-shaped wings, built directly on the bare rock, flanked by three powerful round towers. These remaining towers show architectural differences, evidence of building over an extended period. Built in the flamboyant Gothic architecture, the castle impresses both in area and height, by the number of its machicolations, its latrines and its murder holes. It includes beautiful windows and the towers and large windows on the second floor.

The Château de Coupiac is one of a group of 23 castles in Aveyron which have joined together to provide a tourist itinerary as La Route des Seigneurs du Rouergue. The castle is open to visitors from Easter to November.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David ian Jenkins (D.i.s window cleaning) (4 months ago)
Great place to visit
Job Eijlders (3 years ago)
Was closed but looked great
laurent muchacho (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle and amazing work if restoration by volunteers association.
Angel B (3 years ago)
It was closed so couldn't get in
Angel B (3 years ago)
It was closed so couldn't get in
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