The Rånäs manor (or Rånäs castle) was built in the 1850s by the Reuterskiöld family at the site of a 17th century manor, torn down after the completion of the present manor. Rånäs manor was designed by the leading architect of the time, professor Per Axel Nyström. Rånäs manor had a charter from 1774 for the yearly production of 1500 ship pounds (260,000 kg) of bar iron. In the fields surrounding the manor grain was cultivated and in its wide-stretched forests coal was bunkered. The manor also included a long low row of houses for the families of the workers employed at the manor, a position which was considered lifelong.

Following the 1932 Krueger Crash the manor was sold to the Municipality of Stockholm and used as a mental hospital until 1985. In 1996 the manor was bought by two private individuals and extensively restored. Since 1998 Rånäs Manor has been a hotel and conference center.

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Details

Founded: 1850's
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gelu Gurgu (3 months ago)
Este o locatie deosebita, un castel cu o istorie specială. transformat destul de recent in hotel. Nu lipsesc stafiile, care dau tarcoale numai in anumite zone ale castelului si numai cand vor ele...! In rest, castelul este un hotel de lux, cu o mâncare foarte bună si un personal foarte amabil. Este cu-adevărat un loc special iar daca te vei lasa sedus de atmosfera speciala a castelului, vei ramâne cu o amintire deosebită.
kennerth andersson (5 months ago)
Trevligt ställe att bo o äta
Grzegorz Miechowicz (6 months ago)
Ciekawe miejsce
Isabelle Hesselberg (9 months ago)
Exceptional wedding venue, amazing staff! I always enjoy photographing weddings at Rånäs and can highly recommend this place.
Virginia Alvariza (9 months ago)
Var där på en slottsweekend i april. Åkte därifrån otroligt nöjda. Allt var toppenbra från första början till avresan. Bemötandet, servicen, självaste slottet med den vackra inredningen, maten, rummet, bastun, jacuzzin nere vid sjön, allt! Vackert slott både på utsidan och insidan och med en vacker omgivning. Kommer definitivt tillbaka och rekommenderar varmt detta ställe. Tack!
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