The Rånäs manor (or Rånäs castle) was built in the 1850s by the Reuterskiöld family at the site of a 17th century manor, torn down after the completion of the present manor. Rånäs manor was designed by the leading architect of the time, professor Per Axel Nyström. Rånäs manor had a charter from 1774 for the yearly production of 1500 ship pounds (260,000 kg) of bar iron. In the fields surrounding the manor grain was cultivated and in its wide-stretched forests coal was bunkered. The manor also included a long low row of houses for the families of the workers employed at the manor, a position which was considered lifelong.

Following the 1932 Krueger Crash the manor was sold to the Municipality of Stockholm and used as a mental hospital until 1985. In 1996 the manor was bought by two private individuals and extensively restored. Since 1998 Rånäs Manor has been a hotel and conference center.

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Details

Founded: 1850's
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik Strandberg (2 years ago)
I think you need to love this kind of place, if not you will be dissapointed by the food. The food is ok but for this price you will find better food with ease in Stockholm. The Breakfast was like any scandic Hotel. So, i do not recommend staying here if food is your main reason.
Barry Watson (2 years ago)
Great day here. Beautiful scenery and also to the art exhibition on display here untill 16th Aug. The exhibition has art from various artists with paintings on display inside the cafe building and many sculptures situated around the grounds. Was very peaceful and intriguing walk through the castle grounds.
Łukasz Iwachów (2 years ago)
Fantastic place ???
Tejas Oza (2 years ago)
Beautiful lake. Only special guests allowed.
Petter Nyman (2 years ago)
For a company conference with colleagues based in the city? It’s really far away, like: really. Driving to Rånäs during winter will take you almost twice the time you think it will (ok, maybe just like 30 minutes longer, but still!). The food was great and the staff knowledgeable! Rooms are small and pretty old (but it’s a frickin’ castle, what did you expect?). The sauna is fantastic, multiple hot tubs and ice bathing in the winter!
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