The Ponttor is one of the two remaining gates of the original city wall of Aachen. It was built in the 14th century and manned by soldiers and militia throughout the Free Imperial City of Aachen era. Today, the Ponttor is used by German Youth and Scout groups.

The Ponttor was constructed as a right-angled three-stock tower castle. In the main entrance, there is a Portcullis as well as a machicolation, through which things could be dropped on invading forces. A bridge passage with crenelations spanned a moat and was strengthened in the foregate with two reinforced towers (barbicans). The building material was Devonian sandstone, Pennsylvanian carbonite sandstone and quartzite, with the framing material made of light bluestone.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Rohit Ravi (2 years ago)
The popular city gate in Aachen. Ponttor has a variety of restaurants around it which are popular. Chicken Pont, Pont Grill, Sultans of Kebap, Habibi etc to name a few! The Ponttor gate is a junction connecting Roermonder Straße, Audimax, Lousberg and Pontstraße.
Sheikh Zuhaib (2 years ago)
lots of pubs and cafe around..good place to hangout
Wissam Zaghloul (2 years ago)
Cool place.. I sometimes hide from rain there if I'm waiting for the bus .. the landmark (Ponttor) stands out in Aachen.. so if you're meeting someone you'll be sure they'll find you.
Yazeed Abdul Rahim (2 years ago)
Although it is actually the Pint Gate at the beginning of the street, a historical site, but it is locally referred to that street with a lot of restaurants (Turkish fast food, Asian, etc..) and the night life.
Maarten Labeeuw (2 years ago)
Nicely preserved gatehouse, part of the medieval city fortifications. Sadly very little else is left, and the is no information on site detailing it's history. The city planners have integrated it well with the modern infrastructure necessities, by making use of the historically lower ground level to connect it to pedestrian underpasses.
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