Schloss Brake was a former residence of the Counts of Lippe. The first castle was built after 1190. In 1447 it was conquered and burned during the feud. The current appearance dates mainly from the 1570-1587 when it was modernized in Weser Renaissance style. In 1663, Count Casimir of Lippe-Brake rebuilt the east wing to its present form. Since 1986 the Weser Renaissance Museum has been located in the castle.

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Details

Founded: 1570-1587
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

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museum-schloss-brake.de

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mathias Jakobsson (2 years ago)
Nice
angela conifer (2 years ago)
A gem of a place, off the main road and accessable by foot and car but could see many parking places. The castle is a museum that is very well maintained. housing many interesting artefacts which explain the history of the castle and surrounding.ding areas. Visitors are able to wonder around and look out of tower windows at the beautiful views an old mill remains working and can be seen close up as you stand on the little bridge. Nice walks around the area are well used and are easily accessable. I believe this is a must to see if you are in the Lemgo area.
Marion Birnstein (2 years ago)
Ein nettes kleines Schloß. Wer etwas über die Geschichte der weserrenaissance erfahren möchte, ist hier richtig. Auch für Kinder ist es interessant. Möglichkeiten zum ausprobieren gibt es. Aber auch für Erwachsene gibt es Sachen auszuprobieren. So zum Beispiel die Perspektive im zeichnen. Die Turmbesteigung ist nur etwas für fitte Leute geeignet.
Jörg Beyer (2 years ago)
Alles renoviert und perfekt gestaltet. Wir haben die Räumlichkeiten für eine Abend-Veranstaltung mit 150 Gästen genutzt. Wirklich sehr schöne Räumlichkeiten!
Fran Bower (2 years ago)
Lovely Renaissance castle full of interesting corners and a tower too climb.
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Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

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From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

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Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.