Schloss Brake was a former residence of the Counts of Lippe. The first castle was built after 1190. In 1447 it was conquered and burned during the feud. The current appearance dates mainly from the 1570-1587 when it was modernized in Weser Renaissance style. In 1663, Count Casimir of Lippe-Brake rebuilt the east wing to its present form. Since 1986 the Weser Renaissance Museum has been located in the castle.

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Details

Founded: 1570-1587
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

More Information

museum-schloss-brake.de

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mathias Jakobsson (20 months ago)
Nice
angela conifer (20 months ago)
A gem of a place, off the main road and accessable by foot and car but could see many parking places. The castle is a museum that is very well maintained. housing many interesting artefacts which explain the history of the castle and surrounding.ding areas. Visitors are able to wonder around and look out of tower windows at the beautiful views an old mill remains working and can be seen close up as you stand on the little bridge. Nice walks around the area are well used and are easily accessable. I believe this is a must to see if you are in the Lemgo area.
Marion Birnstein (21 months ago)
Ein nettes kleines Schloß. Wer etwas über die Geschichte der weserrenaissance erfahren möchte, ist hier richtig. Auch für Kinder ist es interessant. Möglichkeiten zum ausprobieren gibt es. Aber auch für Erwachsene gibt es Sachen auszuprobieren. So zum Beispiel die Perspektive im zeichnen. Die Turmbesteigung ist nur etwas für fitte Leute geeignet.
Jörg Beyer (21 months ago)
Alles renoviert und perfekt gestaltet. Wir haben die Räumlichkeiten für eine Abend-Veranstaltung mit 150 Gästen genutzt. Wirklich sehr schöne Räumlichkeiten!
Fran Bower (22 months ago)
Lovely Renaissance castle full of interesting corners and a tower too climb.
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