Schloss Brake was a former residence of the Counts of Lippe. The first castle was built after 1190. In 1447 it was conquered and burned during the feud. The current appearance dates mainly from the 1570-1587 when it was modernized in Weser Renaissance style. In 1663, Count Casimir of Lippe-Brake rebuilt the east wing to its present form. Since 1986 the Weser Renaissance Museum has been located in the castle.

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Details

Founded: 1570-1587
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

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museum-schloss-brake.de

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mathias Jakobsson (3 years ago)
Nice
angela conifer (3 years ago)
A gem of a place, off the main road and accessable by foot and car but could see many parking places. The castle is a museum that is very well maintained. housing many interesting artefacts which explain the history of the castle and surrounding.ding areas. Visitors are able to wonder around and look out of tower windows at the beautiful views an old mill remains working and can be seen close up as you stand on the little bridge. Nice walks around the area are well used and are easily accessable. I believe this is a must to see if you are in the Lemgo area.
Marion Birnstein (3 years ago)
Ein nettes kleines Schloß. Wer etwas über die Geschichte der weserrenaissance erfahren möchte, ist hier richtig. Auch für Kinder ist es interessant. Möglichkeiten zum ausprobieren gibt es. Aber auch für Erwachsene gibt es Sachen auszuprobieren. So zum Beispiel die Perspektive im zeichnen. Die Turmbesteigung ist nur etwas für fitte Leute geeignet.
Jörg Beyer (3 years ago)
Alles renoviert und perfekt gestaltet. Wir haben die Räumlichkeiten für eine Abend-Veranstaltung mit 150 Gästen genutzt. Wirklich sehr schöne Räumlichkeiten!
Fran Bower (3 years ago)
Lovely Renaissance castle full of interesting corners and a tower too climb.
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The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

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Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

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In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.