Bladenhorst castle was first mentioed in 1266 as the residence of the lords of Blarnhurst lived there. At the beginning of the 14th century it became the possession of the family of Düngelen. In 1338, Rötger Düngelen made the castle available to the Duchy of Cleves to use in the event of war. Through marriage, in 1496 the castle passed to Philip of Viermünden. From 1624 to 1881 it was inherited by the Westphalian noble family of von Romberg.

The structure originally consisted of four wings. The gatehouse is the oldest part of the building, the chapel dates from 1332. The castle as it stands is in the style of the Renaissance - coming from its rebuilding between 1530 and 1584.

Today castle is still inhabited, and privately owned, consequently there are no public tours or visits, some parts of the castle are rented out to private individuals.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justyna Borowa (2 years ago)
Ein wunderschönes Schloss. Ein charmanter Ort. Einen Besuch wert Rund um tolle Radrouten. Wiosną przepiękny. Duży. Robi wrażenie. Niedaleko świetne trasy ma rower i fajna knajpka. Polecam zobaczyć ten
Angie Schaffrin (2 years ago)
Wunderschönes kleines Schloss in Privatbesitz. Eine Umrundung ist leider nicht möglich. Für weitere Informationen am besten auf der Website nachschauen. Vom Wanderparkplatz vor dem Schloss führen aber mehrere Wanderwege durch die unmittelbare Umgebung. Daumen hoch.
U. M. (2 years ago)
Ist schön anzuschauen, aber wohl nicht zugänglich, da in Privatbesitz.
Lientjie Maritz (2 years ago)
Go for a wonderful stroll and sightseeing!!
Moshé Issaharov (3 years ago)
Pretty
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).