Klusenstein Castle

Hemer, Germany

Klusenstein castle was built in 1353 by Gerhard of Plettenberg, a vassal of earl Engelbrecht III of the Mark. The castle formed the boundary fortification of the earldom Mark to the bishopric state of Cologne and the earldom Arnsberg. All three territories met at the Hönne river valley, the castle was also overlooking an old road crossing the valley. During the feud between earl Engelbert and Gottfried IV of Arnsberg, the castle was under siege in 1366, but did not fall.

When the last earl of Arnsberg, Gottfried IV, sold the earldom to the bishop of Cologne, the castle lost its importance. Until the 17th century the family of Werminghausen owned the castle. During the 30 years war (1618-48) both Swedish and Hessian troops stayed in the castle. In 1695 the Brabeck family bought the castle, and was sold in 1812 to the Löbbecke family. In 1904 it was sold to the Hoesch company, and now belongs to the company Rheinkalk.

The castle is located on a 60m high cliff over the Hönne river valley, at around the narrowest part of the valley. At the bottom of the rock is a small cave in total 51m long. One corridor bends upward, but about 30m below the plateau it is blocked by stones. There were legends about a secret escapeway of the castle, in 2003 the top entrance to the cave was found below the eastern palais destroyed in 1840.

Below the castle is a mill, however though named Klusenstein mill it did not belong to castle. Since 1912 the railway connecting Balve and Menden runs directly below the castle.

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Address

Klusenstein, Hemer, Germany
See all sites in Hemer

Details

Founded: 1353
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabian B. (15 months ago)
Wunderschön
Irena Elbel (16 months ago)
Historische Sehenswürdigkeit? Von wegen!!!Man wird mit Nachdruck gebeten, sofort wieder ins Auto zu steigen. Diese Dame, die hier wohl "Burgherrin" ist, gibt einen super Kettenhund ab.
Nadine Turk (17 months ago)
Ein schöner Ort, weil mitten im Naturschutzgebiet. Allerdings darf man hier keinen Burgbesuch erwarten. Das Anwesen ist in Privatbesitz. 3 Sachen die mir sehr negativ aufgestoßen sind, und deswegen appelliere ich an die Hundebesitzer die dort samt Hund sehr zahlreich anzutreffen sind: lasst euren Hund bitte angeleint!!! Naturschutzgebiet!!! An die Eigentümer der Burg: lasst die Gebäude doch bitte nicht so zerfallen! An die Autofahrer: haltet euch bitte an das Durchfahrtverbotsschild! Ansonsten echt schön da oben.
H B (2 years ago)
Leider darf man hier nicht rein: Betreten Verboten !! Privatbesitz!! Von weitem hat man zwar einen schönen Blick, aber eigentlich lohnt es sich nicht.
Jörg Esser (2 years ago)
Toller Blick auf die Burganlage vom Hönnetal aus
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