Klusenstein Castle

Hemer, Germany

Klusenstein castle was built in 1353 by Gerhard of Plettenberg, a vassal of earl Engelbrecht III of the Mark. The castle formed the boundary fortification of the earldom Mark to the bishopric state of Cologne and the earldom Arnsberg. All three territories met at the Hönne river valley, the castle was also overlooking an old road crossing the valley. During the feud between earl Engelbert and Gottfried IV of Arnsberg, the castle was under siege in 1366, but did not fall.

When the last earl of Arnsberg, Gottfried IV, sold the earldom to the bishop of Cologne, the castle lost its importance. Until the 17th century the family of Werminghausen owned the castle. During the 30 years war (1618-48) both Swedish and Hessian troops stayed in the castle. In 1695 the Brabeck family bought the castle, and was sold in 1812 to the Löbbecke family. In 1904 it was sold to the Hoesch company, and now belongs to the company Rheinkalk.

The castle is located on a 60m high cliff over the Hönne river valley, at around the narrowest part of the valley. At the bottom of the rock is a small cave in total 51m long. One corridor bends upward, but about 30m below the plateau it is blocked by stones. There were legends about a secret escapeway of the castle, in 2003 the top entrance to the cave was found below the eastern palais destroyed in 1840.

Below the castle is a mill, however though named Klusenstein mill it did not belong to castle. Since 1912 the railway connecting Balve and Menden runs directly below the castle.

Comments

Your name



Address

Klusenstein, Hemer, Germany
See all sites in Hemer

Details

Founded: 1353
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabian B. (2 years ago)
Wunderschön
Irena Elbel (2 years ago)
Historische Sehenswürdigkeit? Von wegen!!!Man wird mit Nachdruck gebeten, sofort wieder ins Auto zu steigen. Diese Dame, die hier wohl "Burgherrin" ist, gibt einen super Kettenhund ab.
Nadine Turk (2 years ago)
Ein schöner Ort, weil mitten im Naturschutzgebiet. Allerdings darf man hier keinen Burgbesuch erwarten. Das Anwesen ist in Privatbesitz. 3 Sachen die mir sehr negativ aufgestoßen sind, und deswegen appelliere ich an die Hundebesitzer die dort samt Hund sehr zahlreich anzutreffen sind: lasst euren Hund bitte angeleint!!! Naturschutzgebiet!!! An die Eigentümer der Burg: lasst die Gebäude doch bitte nicht so zerfallen! An die Autofahrer: haltet euch bitte an das Durchfahrtverbotsschild! Ansonsten echt schön da oben.
H B (3 years ago)
Leider darf man hier nicht rein: Betreten Verboten !! Privatbesitz!! Von weitem hat man zwar einen schönen Blick, aber eigentlich lohnt es sich nicht.
Jörg Esser (3 years ago)
Toller Blick auf die Burganlage vom Hönnetal aus
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kraków Cloth Hall

The Cloth Hall in Kraków dates to the Renaissance and is one of the city's most recognizable icons. It is the central feature of the main market square in the Kraków Old Town (listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978).

The hall was once a major centre of international trade. Traveling merchants met there to discuss business and to barter. During its golden age in the 15th century, the hall was the source of a variety of exotic imports from the east – spices, silk, leather and wax – while Kraków itself exported textiles, lead, and salt from the Wieliczka Salt Mine.

Kraków was Poland's capital city and was among the largest cities in Europe already from before the time of the Renaissance. However, its decline started with the move of the capital to Warsaw in the very end of the 16th century. The city's decline was hastened by wars and politics leading to the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century. By the time of the architectural restoration proposed for the cloth hall in 1870 under Austrian rule, much of the historic city center was decrepit. A change in political and economic fortunes for the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria ushered in a revival due to newly established Legislative Assembly or Sejm of the Land. The successful renovation of the Cloth Hall, based on design by Tomasz Pryliński and supervised by Mayor Mikołaj Zyblikiewicz, Sejm Marshal, was one of the most notable achievements of this period.

The hall has hosted many distinguished guests over the centuries and is still used to entertain monarchs and dignitaries, such as Charles, Prince of Wales and Emperor Akihito of Japan, who was welcomed here in 2002. In the past, balls were held here, most notably after Prince Józef Poniatowski had briefly liberated the city from the Austrians in 1809. Aside from its history and cultural value, the hall still is still used as a center of commerce.

On the upper floor of the hall is the Sukiennice Museum division of the National Museum, Kraków. It holds the largest permanent exhibit of the 19th-century Polish painting and sculpture, in four grand exhibition halls arranged by historical period and the theme extending into an entire artistic epoch. The museum was upgraded in 2010 with new technical equipment, storerooms, service spaces as well as improved thematic layout for the display.

The Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art was a major cultural venue from the moment it opened on October 7, 1879. It features late Baroque, Rococo, and Classicist 18th-century portraits and battle scenes by Polish and foreign pre-Romantics.