Basilica of St. Vitus

Mönchengladbach, Germany

The first true knowledge about the foundation of the St. Vitus abbey dates back to a document from the late 11th century, probably from the scriptorium of the monastery of Gladbach. This richly illuminated document reports that a nobleman long before the founding of the abbey would have erected a church on the top of the hill, a church destroyed by the Magyars in 954.

In 1120, at the latest, the monastery was affected by the Benedictine reform Siegburg. The nave of the abbey got its definitive form between 1228 and 1239. Between 1256 and 1277, while reconstruction was developing, the idea of building a new choir appeared, but on a different plane (the typical elongated choir of the Gothic style). In order to carry out this plan, Master Gerhard, the first architect of Cologne Cathedral brought to his experience. Albert the Great consecrated the abbey on April 28, 1275.

The old Benedictine monastery church was elevated in 1973 to the rank of Minor Basilica by Pope Paul VI.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1228-1277
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcin Tiemann (2 years ago)
Nice church on the hill in the city centre.
Marcin Tiemann (Timmy) (2 years ago)
Nice church on the hill in the city centre.
Fayaz Osmany (3 years ago)
Beautiful view
Uchenna O.Y (3 years ago)
It's a reminder of what the holy Catholic church and the old city of Mönchengladbach was.
Bety Pover (3 years ago)
cool
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.