The development of Stolberg Castle in its present appearance was essentially proceeded in three phases. In the second half of the 13th century, the original castle (built by the lords of Stalburg in the 12th century) was rebuilt by Wilhelm I of Nesselrode and his son Wilhelm II. After damaged during the Guelders Wars (1502-1543), Hieronymus von Efferen renovated the Stolberg after 1542. A third construction phase was made after 1888 by the manufacturer Moritz Kraus. 

Stolberg castle has an late medieval complex on the highest level, with the former guard tower, Palas, two towers, the Renaissance court hall as well as the upper gate, the western tower and the remains of the curtain wall. The second part includes additions of the 19th and 20th centuries, which were built on the second to fourth floors.

Today, Stolberg Castle hosts cultural events and clubs. In the cellar there is a restaurant and a home and crafts museum.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.burg-stolberg.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gangalic Catalin (7 months ago)
Pretty nice castle like building. Unfortunately, due to the pandemic, everything was closed. But just walking around is also nice.
Bogdan-Mircea Bodnarescu (8 months ago)
The rating is given without visiting the museum or restaurant because of Corona. This Castle is a real surprise, because you don't expect it to be so big and imposing u til you are actually there. I was impressed by the construction and by how good preserved it is. Definitely a place to visit when you are in Aachen.
Vadim Nelidov (11 months ago)
A magnificent castle in a very pretty historic village. It is surrounded by small historic streets and can make a nice day trip adventure. Only a pity that there’s not much to see inside.
Aneta Neykova-the World's citizen (12 months ago)
My second visit to the castle. Pity that one third of the castle was closed so we couldn't go everywhere. It has own free of charge parking, a restaurant, free entrance. Nothing much to see nowadays. But the cappuccino was delicious, friendly staff.
AMIT SRIVASTAVA (2 years ago)
Very old, strong Castle with a nice museum to learn more about the history of region and industrialization from Stolberg. Underground visit to s mine, ghost room and restaurant with nice sittings are good fit. Very nice view of whole town and valley from the top....
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