Archaeological Museum of Chania

Chaniá, Greece

The Archaeological Museum of Chania was established in 1962. to the house built probably in the 1500s. It served as a Venetian church inhabited by Franciscan monks, and became an important monument of the city.

During the period of the Ottoman occupation, the building was used as a mosque and named after Yussuf Pasha, the conqueror of Chania. At the turn of the 20th century it became the cinema and after World War II it served as a storehouse for military equipment, until it was converted into the museum in 1962. The archaeological collection of Chania itself was formerly housed in various public buildings such as the Residency, the Boys’ High School, and the Hassan Mosque.

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Address

Chalidon 25, Chaniá, Greece
See all sites in Chaniá

Details

Founded: 1962
Category: Museums in Greece

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Judæ ! (3 years ago)
It's really amazing to see the ancient stone and structures
Alex hill (3 years ago)
Nice, small museum in former Venetian church. Translations in English are good. Mainly Greek pottery with a small amount of Roman finds. Worth it with an interest in the subject; however for the regular tourist not the most interesting exhibition.
iuli paraschiv (3 years ago)
Interesting items for the people that are not staying in the sun all of their holiday.
max k (3 years ago)
Very interesting place, well presented. Definitely worth visiting.
Alinne F. Bertolin (4 years ago)
Great collection of historical items. Museum is cozy and staffs are friendly. All the labels are in Greek and English. I loved the examples of jewelry that had been found here. Entrance is 2€
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