Agia Triada Monastery

Chaniá, Greece

Agia Triada (Holy Trinity) Orthodox Monastery was built in the 17th century by two brothers of the Venetian Zangaroli family on the site of a pre-existing church.

The church is built in the Byzantine architectural cruciform style with three domes. The main church is flanked by two smaller domed chapels, one of which is dedicated to the Life-Giving Spring (Zoodochos Pigi) and the other to Saint John the Theologian. The main church is dedicated to the Holy Trinity and the church has a narthex at the front set at right angles to the main aisle. There are two large Doric-style columns and one smaller, Corinthian-style column on either side of the main entrance. The facade of the church has double columns of Ionian and Corinthian style and bears an inscription in Greek, which is dated to 1631. The monastery's cellar door is dated to 1613. In the 19th century the monastery was established as an important theological school from 1833, and the belfry is dated to 1864. The monastery was later extensively damaged during conflicts with the Turks and in 1892, a seminary was established.

The monastery also has a library which contains some rare books, and a museum which contains a collection of icons and a collection of codices. Important exhibits include a portable icon of St John the Theologian dated to around 1500, The Last Judgment, work of Emmanuel Skordiles from 17th century, St John the Precursor (1846), The Tree of Jesse (1853), The Hospitality of Abraham and The Descent into Hades (1855), The Story of Beauteaus Joseph (1858) and a manuscript on a parchment roll with the mass of St Basil.

The monks produce and sell wine and olive oil on the premises.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dominik Platek (2 years ago)
Fantastic monastir complex. Beautifull buildings, many cats walking around, very special atmosphere. You come in and you can feel that it's place separated from world by different time pressure
Tatiana Vermeir (2 years ago)
Very nice place and ideal to visit briefly before returning to the airport!
Keith Clerens (2 years ago)
Very impressive. Try for sure also the oil and moscato whine.
Valen Correa (2 years ago)
Loved it! Really nice place much better than the Arcady! The atmosphere is nice and the cats are friendly.
Andrew Schwartz (3 years ago)
Excellent visit, nice tasting room with wines, olive oils, and some balsamic-type reductions. Interesting related products for sale, a neat barrel cellar with great acoustics, and some artefacts on exhibit. Upstairs in the monastery itself was serene, pleasant to walk through the buildings and fields of fruit and olive trees. Ornate religious hall seemed almost out of place next to all this, and I'm sure very lovely to visit for this who are into that sort of thing.
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