Antibes Cathedral

Antibes, France

Antibes Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Platea d'Antibes) has been gradually built from the 5th or 6th century on the site of a pagan temple. The remains of this temple can be seen in the Chapel of the Holy Spirit. It is said that St Paul was arrested here on a journey to Spain in 63 AD. Destroyed by the barbarians in 1124, the church was rebuilt in the early 13th century. The plan is with three naves. The church has undergone many transformations over the centuries.

The current facade is in Italian style from 1747 rebuilt after a heavy bombardment. Interior, some masterpieces from the Reaissance and Modern times: A crucifix from the middle of the 15th century in the choir. The transept chapel is a masterpiece painted by Provençal artist Louis Brea in the 16th century: it represents The Virgin with Rosary. Do not leave without admiring the carved portal by Jacques Dole from the beginning of the 18th century.

It was formerly the seat of the Bishops of Antibes, later the Bishops of Grasse. The seat was not restored after the French Revolution and was added by the Concordat of 1801 to the Diocese of Nice.

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Details

Founded: 13th century/1747
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Popa (2 years ago)
Foarte frumos. Antibes Cathedral is a Roman Catholic church located in the town of Antibes on the French Riviera, France. It is a national monument. During the 5th or 6th century a cathedral was built on the site where a pagan temple had once stood, the remains of which can be seen in the Chapel of the Holy Spirit. It is said that St Paul was arrested here on a journey to Spain in 63 AD. The church has undergone many transformations over the centuries. Partly destroyed in 1124, the church was rebuilt by the early 13th century. Its layout features three naves and a large organ to the rear. The current facade is in the Italian style, dating from 1747 when it was rebuilt after heavy bombardment. In the interior are a number of masterpieces from the Renaissance and Modern periods; a crucifix from the middle of the 15th century is visible in the choir. The transept chapel was painted by Provençal artist Louis Brea in the 16th century, representing The Virgin with the Rosary. The carved portal by Jacques Dole is from the beginning of the 18th century. It was formerly the seat of the Bishops of Antibes, later the Bishops of Grasse. The see was not restored after the French Revolution and was added by the Concordat of 1801 to the Diocese of Nice.
David Fargot (3 years ago)
Catholic masses need an overhaul
Shrikant Sonawane (3 years ago)
Nice place to visit along the beach!
Sylvain Gressot (3 years ago)
Belle cathédrale, sobre mais très inspirée.
Timothy Chandler (3 years ago)
Nice church nothing fancy.
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