Musée Picasso

Antibes, France

The Musée Picasso, formerly the Château Grimaldi at Antibes, is built upon the foundations of the ancient Greek town of Antipolis. The castle was a residence of the bishops in the Middle Ages (from 442 to 1385). The castle was moved in 1385 to the Monegasque family. In 1608 it became a stronghold of the Grimaldi family and has borne their name ever since. In 1702 it became the town hall of Antibes.

From 1925 the chateau was known as the Grimaldi Museum. In 1946 it was the home for six months of the artist Pablo Picasso. Today the museum is known as the Picasso Museum, the first museum in the world to be dedicated to the artist.

Picasso himself donated works to the museum, most notably his paintings 'The Goat' and 'La Joie de Vivre'. In 1990 Jacqueline Picasso bequested many works by Picasso to the museum. These included 4 paintings, 10 drawings, 2 ceramics and 6 etchings. These are displayed at the Château in addition to the 3 works on paper, 60 etchings and 6 carpets by Pablo Picasso which the museum collected between 1952 and 2001. Today the collection totals 245 works by Picasso.

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Details

Founded: 11th century / 1966 (museum)
Category: Museums in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Varghese John (19 months ago)
Good collection of Picasso works. Need to be an artist to really appreciate it and I was not one of those.
Ian Encarnacion (20 months ago)
For those visiting using the French Riviera Pass, it is required to have the same verified before the Tourism Office before being used in the Musee. It was good that the staff allowed us to go inside because we have babies. Limited Picasso artwork.
Ricky Wood (21 months ago)
This review is for the museum itself, not Picasso's work. I don't think I'll understand his work ever. It's good, I just don't know. The museum was wonderful. Staff was helpful and nice. The layout worked pretty well and there was a lot more to see than I thought there would be. There is also an area on top where you can get a great view of the Sea. I can see why this place inspired such great artists.
Jan Be (2 years ago)
This is a serious gallery, so only worth visiting if you want to learn stuff. Take advantage of multi-entry with the ticket, and especially the adjacent archaeological museum and it's hypocaust. Get back down the hill and the military museum, also included, is fantastic. Please remember this museum is also a war memorial and that Napoleon is a respected historical figure here. If you walk there from the centre, be prepared for a long climb.
Boristofu Povolotsky (2 years ago)
Personally, I think it's a MUST SEE when travelling in Antibes, and even when travelling in Nice. The chronological order of the paintings create a suspenseful story, that left my NOT SO FOND OF ART wife thrilled and interested in art even after the visit. Can't say too much from a professional artistic level, so as a regular human being, I enjoyed it very much.
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