Linnaeus Hammarby

Uppsala, Sweden

Linnaeus Hammarby is one of three botanical gardens belonging to Uppsala University in Sweden. It was the former summer home of Carolus Linnaeus and his family. Today, few Swedish manor-houses preserve such an authentic milieu. It reflects the private life of Linnaeus as well as his scientific work.

In 1758 Linnaeus bought two small estates: Sävja and Hammarby. During their first summers at Hammarby the Linnaeuses lived in the detached west wing. The main building at Hammarby was built in 1762. Linnaeus also had a small, and reasonably fireproof, museum built at Hammarby where he kept his extensive natural history collections.

Linnaeus recieved many visitors at Hammarby. Inside or outside the museum, he lectured from a peculiar lecture stool, "plugghästen" (Sw. plugga - to study, häst - horse).

After Linnaeus´ death in 1778 his wife Sara Lisa remained at Hammarby for many years together with two of their daughters. The Swedish State bought the houses and the park from his descendants in 1879 and it is now managed by Uppsala University.

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Details

Founded: 1758
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maria Karlin (3 years ago)
A fun place to go for coffee during the summer. The outdoor seating is situated by the apple trees where you can taste the different apple varieties. The salmon open sandwich is a good choice for snack
Michael Lee (3 years ago)
Linnaeus's home. It's not a big place but you can feel the historical atmosphere. Sometimes they will have a market, which farmers will sell their products
Adam Amin (3 years ago)
Beautiful and well-preserved buildings and gardens. The furniture used by Carl von Linné and his family remains in it's original position in the house. We had a proficient guide showing us around.
Viktor Ståhl (3 years ago)
Very well worth guided trip which gives a lot more of information about Linné and his family's life.
Dirk-Jan de Koning (3 years ago)
We only visited the cafe this time. The potato salad was fine. However the fresh baked waffle was not nice: very greasy and not done in the middle. The seating in the orchard is nice.
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