The Château Grimaldi at Cagnes-sur-Mer is built on the site of an earlier fortress occupied by the Greeks and then the Romans. The present castle was built in 1309 by Rainier Grimaldi (Lord of Cagnes and an admiral of France) - a distant ancestor of the present ruling house of Monaco. Later it became the residence of the Governors of the province. Following the French Revolution, it was used as barracks and later as a hospital. Now owned by the city of Cagnes, it is known as le Château Musée Grimaldi.

Built upon a hilltop, the castle towers over the town. Constructed in the local stone, it retains many of its original medieval features and motifs, it is machicolated with crenelations surmounting its towers and keep. The castle is built around a triangular courtyard. During the reign of Louis XIII (1610 to 1643) the castle was altered, and the principal rooms made more comfortable and redecorated in the contemporary taste. The great hall has a painted ceiling depicting the Fall of Phaëton, completed in the 1620s by the Genovese painter Giulio Benso, while the chapel has a ceiling painted with folk scenes.

Today the castle is an exhibition centre for contemporary art from around the world, and a museum of modern art.

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ANN MARIE FINN-CUSICK said 4 years ago
9-18-2017, A SPLENDID PALACE WITH ANCIENT HISTORY DESIGNED BY "THE CREATOR" FOR GRACE PATRICIA KELLY/GRIMALDI AND HUSBAND, RANIER GRIMALDI, MARRIED 1956, THREE CHILDREN BORN TO GRACE AND RANIER. MANY, MANY GRAND-CHILDREN TOO!!!


Details

Founded: 1309
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Saoirse Cahir (10 months ago)
Great food and a great stay, super pretty and everyone is so friendly and kind
swag (10 months ago)
Great food and a great stay, super pretty and everyone is so friendly and kind
Ian Thomas (18 months ago)
The rooms, food, service and location of this hilltop hotel are all excellent. I never wanted to leave and will return.
Katja Rugaas (2 years ago)
A beautiful little place by the chateau. Very good and deliciously prepared food!
Katja Rugaas (2 years ago)
A beautiful little place by the chateau. Very good and deliciously prepared food!
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