Palais Lascaris

Nice, France

The Palais Lascaris is currently a musical instrument museum. Located in the old town of Nice, it houses a collection of over 500 instruments, which makes it France’s second most important collection.

Built in the first half of the 17th century and altered in the 18th century, the palace was owned by the Vintimille-Lascaris family until 1802. In 1942, it was bought by the city of Nice to create a museum. The restorations began in 1962 and were completed in 1970, when the museum was opened to the public.

The historical musical instrument collection is formed around the bequest of the nineteenth-century niçois collector Antoine Gautier (1825-1904).

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Address

Rue de la Loge 13, Nice, France
See all sites in Nice

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lyubov L (4 months ago)
Hidden gem in the Vieux Nice. When passing by - you will think that it is just another typical edifice of this neighborhood. However when entering this humble building - you will be impressed by what you discover inside! Baroque everywhere. What a gem ! What an amazing museum. Architecture of the palais itself is terrific.
Steve W (4 months ago)
Beautiful inside, great collection of musical instruments too and a great temporary exhibition at the moment
Christer Elmehagen (4 months ago)
A nice museum to visit. Fantastic ceilings. Has a collection of old instruments.
Barb Fredrickson (4 months ago)
Small museum but full of history. Very interesting
Sujir Pavithra Nayak (6 months ago)
Interesting museum, with some unique instruments and preserved items.
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