Grasse Cathedral

Grasse, France

The medieval church of Notre-Dame du Puy in Grasse was raised to cathedral status in 1244, when the bishop transferred from Antibes to Grasse.

Its Provençal Romanesque style has been well preserved throughout the centuries. In the 17th century, an exterior staircase was built, while a chapel dedicated to the Saint Sacrament was added in 1740, in a beautiful Baroque style.

The cathedral’s strict, basic style, structure, vaults, and discreet décor reflect Lombardian and Ligurian influences. It shelters works by such masters as Rubens, Charles Nègre, a beautiful triptych by Louis Bréa, and the only religious painting by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Le Lavement des Pieds.

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Details

Founded: 1244
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pablo Fernández (6 months ago)
The outside isn't much but the art inside is quite something.
Alfred Esparza (2 years ago)
This Cathedral is a stunning piece of architecture. Additionally, the views of the Mediterranean and the surrounding area are spectacular.
Suleman Hadi (2 years ago)
A great architectural history. The Bells are as amazing as the cathedral
Kirill Vankov (2 years ago)
A whole Treasury is hidden behind the modest facade: you can find works of Peter Paul Rubens and his school, one of a few religious paintings of Jean-Honoré Fragonard, and many other. It is calm and fresh inside even during hottest summer days. Exciting from the left door you reach an observation point to admire the local landscape and view to the Mediterranean Sea. Must visit tourist attraction.
Jan Huygh (2 years ago)
Grasse has done a serious effort to make wandering around in the city an attraction. Shut you need to visit at least one perfume manufacturer and the perfume museum... but I think drinking a glass in the many small bars is an attraction too !
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The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.