Grasse Cathedral

Grasse, France

The medieval church of Notre-Dame du Puy in Grasse was raised to cathedral status in 1244, when the bishop transferred from Antibes to Grasse.

Its Provençal Romanesque style has been well preserved throughout the centuries. In the 17th century, an exterior staircase was built, while a chapel dedicated to the Saint Sacrament was added in 1740, in a beautiful Baroque style.

The cathedral’s strict, basic style, structure, vaults, and discreet décor reflect Lombardian and Ligurian influences. It shelters works by such masters as Rubens, Charles Nègre, a beautiful triptych by Louis Bréa, and the only religious painting by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Le Lavement des Pieds.

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Details

Founded: 1244
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bamo R (15 months ago)
Absolutely stunning. A few Rubén’s from the 1600s as well as prominent sculptures showing some really lovely craftsmanship.
David Hedges (16 months ago)
Interesting history and some paintings by some very famous artists. A very pleasant place to consider your thoughts.
Pablo Fernández (3 years ago)
The outside isn't much but the art inside is quite something.
Alfred Esparza (4 years ago)
This Cathedral is a stunning piece of architecture. Additionally, the views of the Mediterranean and the surrounding area are spectacular.
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