Broborg Castle

Knivsta, Sweden

Broborg is one of Uppland's most magnificent ancient strongholds, strategically placed on a ridge along the former seaway, the "highway" of its day, that led Vikings to Old Uppsala and the Baltic Sea. The castle was built on a high hill, about 40 m above sea level. The castle was used between 6th and 11th centuries.

The castle had an outer and inner wall. The outer wall protected the longest sides to the south and east.The inner wall is almost completely enclosed and has a circumference of about 200 m. There were entrances in the southeast and west.

The visible walls of the stronghold tell its history and the many sagas associated with the site capture our imagination. One such saga is about Grimsa, the daughter of a powerful Viking chieftain who lies buried in a mound near the stronghold.

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Address

Stenby 25, Knivsta, Sweden
See all sites in Knivsta

Details

Founded: 500-1000 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Migration Period (Sweden)

More Information

www.destinationuppsala.se

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johanna Freding (2 years ago)
Historisk plats, spännande.
Linus Wolter (2 years ago)
Mycket sten. Ha bra skor med dig!
Jonas Holmkvist (2 years ago)
En stor hög med stenar
Thomas Eriksson (3 years ago)
Häftig Hornborg med fin utsikt
Robert Mårtensson (3 years ago)
Very nice viking age hill fort overlooking the ancient sea lane passing below. That sea lane has a pretty exciting history in itself. When the land rising threatened to make the sea lane unusable, they used a natural ridge over the plain below the fort to make the basis for a dam that made an artificial lake, several kilometers long, so that the important sea lane could survive.
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