Château de Gréolières

Gréolières, France

Château de Gréolières was mentioned first time in 1047 when it belonged to the Viscounts of Nice. Counts of Provence decided at the end of the 12th  century to enforce eastern part of Provence against the influence of the Republic of Genoa and local nobility. To control the area of Gréolières, the Count of Provence built the new castle around 1220.

In 1235 Count of Provence gave the castle to Romée de Villeneuve. The castle remained in the hands of his descendants, the lords of Villeneuve-Vence, until the French Revolution. The castle and the village were plundered in 1385 during the clashes between Charles de Duras and Louis II of Anjou.

During the Wars of Religion, in 1574, the castle was attacked by Huguenots and again in 1590 by Duke of Savoy. The castle was restored in the early 17th century, but bombed again during the War of Austrian Succession in 1747 by the Austro-Sardinian troops.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ka P06 (19 months ago)
Duplex cosy, très propre et pratique, bien agencé, propriétaires très sympa.
Tobias Weiher (2 years ago)
Alessandro Mangone (4 years ago)
Pulitissimo, intimo e super comodo
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.