Mirwart Castle is built on a rock rising above the Valley of the Lomme. The oldest parts of the castle date back to the 11th century. It was a stronghold belonging to the duchy of Lorraine. The lords of Mirwart had many bloody conflicts with other feudal lords of the region, such as the lords of Bouillon and Orchimont.

The lords of Mirwart came into conflict with the monks of the powerful Saint-Hubert Abbey, supported by the Prince-Bishop of Liège, who wanted to extend his power in this region to the disadvantage of the Dukes of Lorraine.

The castle was reinforced, sometime between 1077-1082, by Henry of Verdun, bishop of Liege. Following complaints from the abbey of Saint-Hubert, the castle was to be destroyed. This act, however, was not approved by the bishop. In 1099, after regaining control over the fief, Bishop Otbert ordered the reconstruction of the castle, which he granted to Bavon de Waha.

In 1293, against the bishop's wishes, the castle and its estates was acquired by Jean d'Avesnes. This resulted in a conflict between the Prince-Bishop of Liège and his new vassal, who sought support from the Counts of Hainaut, Luxembourg, Namur and Loon, and even from the Dukes of Brabant. Control of the castle changed regularly until it was finally held by Prince-Bishop Adolph II of the Marck.

During the numerous conflicts between Spain, Austria and France in the 17th and 18th centuries, the castle was damaged several times. It was only at the beginning of the 18th century that a long undisturbed period began when extensive renovations and embellishments could be undertaken. During this process the castle gradually lost its strongly fortified character.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the castle was acquired by Aimé-Gabriel d'Artigues, the founder of the famous Vonêche glassworks. Successive proprietors — the families Van der Linden d'Hoogvorst, d'Arrigade and von der Becke — further embellished the castle and turned it into a beautiful country residence. In the middle of the 19th century it was renovated by Alphonse Balat, architect to King Leopold II of Belgium.

After World War II the castle was acquired by the province of Luxembourg. The building was renovated but the province failed to find a use for it. As a result, little by little, the castle was neglected and was subsequently looted by burglars who removed valuable furniture and decorative fittings from the interior.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeffrey King (8 months ago)
Simply beautiful
Myriam Crokaert (8 months ago)
Proficiat aan eigenaar voor renovatie! Prachtig zalig, super service , personneel zeer attent en vriendelijk. Uitzonderlijke ligging , prachtig zicht op Mirwart dorp. Uitzonderlijke nouvelle cuisine...top . Met toekomstige wellness....
Sara Cosimo (8 months ago)
This may be a beautiful hotel, but their customer service is 1-star. We had booked some rooms for a night for a business event and called to enquire about additional services. Most of the time, the reception did not pick up. When we eventually spoke to the hotel, they told us they would get back to us but forgot about our request (?!). We called again multiple times and it took days to get a response. In the end, we cancelled out of pure frustration.
Saza Saza (15 months ago)
Magnificent castle and which will be even more so after renovation ??????
Iliescu Marcelin (2 years ago)
The castle is under renovation.
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