Reuland Castle in Burg-Reuland, near the border of Germany, was probably built after 1148 by the von Reuland nobles. The castle was sold in 1322 to Count John the Blind and the King of Bohemia. On May 24, 1384, King Wenzel of Luxembourg designated Edmund von Engelsdorf the Secretary of the Treasury of Luxembourg, and donated the Castle and the Reuland Domain to him.

The castle's origins can be traced to the 9th and 10th centuries. The entire complex has been modified significantly since then, most importantly to adapt its defences to artillery attacks in the 15th century. Although it was destroyed by French revolutionary troops at the end of the 18th century, it has recently been restored to its former medieval glory.

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Burg-Reuland, Belgium
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Founded: 1148
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

agti agti (5 months ago)
Nice place, free entrance
Omkar Dodwad (8 months ago)
Lovely hidden gem in germenophone beli. People are gentle and they speak French if you can't speak German unlike in North Belgium.
Dries Cools (9 months ago)
Awesome that the castle was open even though it was the middle of November and Corona times. The text on the signs with the explanations were almost completely faded, which was the only downside.
Dries Cools (9 months ago)
Awesome that the castle was open even though it was the middle of November and Corona times. The text on the signs with the explanations were almost completely faded, which was the only downside.
Sandy Grant (12 months ago)
Quiet stop on a road trip. Hard to find parking.
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