St. Olof's Church Ruins

Sigtuna, Sweden

St. Olof's Church was originally built around the year 1100 and it consisted of a main tower, chancel and nave. It was later extended, but the construction was probably interrupted when archbishop’s seat was moved to Gamla Uppsala in the 12th century.

St. Olof's church has been influenced by the Nidaros Cathedral in Norway, while the small tapering windows have an Anglo-Saxon style. The church is dedicated to the Norwegian viking Olaf Tryggvasson, king between 995-1000.

It is not certain by whom the church was built. Most probably it was authored by the Benedictines or local trade guild. Archaelogical excavations have revealed remains under the church, which are thought to have belonged to an even older stone church. It may have been one of the first built in Sweden.

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Address

Olofsgatan 9, Sigtuna, Sweden
See all sites in Sigtuna

Details

Founded: ca.1100
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

wadbring.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Parhat Hebibul (4 months ago)
A cute town with classic Scandinavia Viking culture. Nice place to visit.
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