Château de Pontevès

Pontevès, France

The Château de Pontevès site is first recorded in a document in 1021 as the property of the monastery of Saint-Victoir in Marseille. Later, the lords of Pontevès progressively developed the site. In 1233 there is mention of a gate to the courtyard and the buildings arranged in the U-shape characteristic of the early 13th century. Further additions between 1560 and 1580 included a new bedroom, a great hall and the northwest tower. Between 1580 and 1590, the castle was defended during the Wars of Religion. In 1626, a billiards room, tennis court, stables and chicken house were added. Gradually, the castle was developed as a comfortable residence rather than a defensive site.

In 1650, François de Pontevès sold the castle to a rich Aix-en-Provence financier, Pierre Maurel, nicknamed the Croesus of Provence. The site then underwent a massive upheaval with most of the ancient edifice being destroyed and the materials reused to construct a vast building containing more than 50 rooms on three levels. Three corner towers were added. A gallery was decorated with trompe l'oeil paintings by Jean Daret.

However, this splendour was not to last. Faults in its constructions and inheritance problems led to a rapid degradation. By the time of the French Revolution the castle was already crumbling and many houses in the village today show evidence of plundering of the site for building materials, particularly doorframes and windows.

The castle today is open to the public. Visitors can see the gateway, four towers, parts of the curtain wall and other ruined structures.

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Pontevès, France
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jérôme Barbaran (9 months ago)
Nice point of view on the plain
Daniel Delicourt (10 months ago)
The castle is a ruin but the route of the hike from Gorbio and back to Sainte Agnès is magical. The climb is difficult, reserved for good walkers, the panorama is sublime.
Amandine D'Anella (11 months ago)
Ruins of the castle of sabrans-pontèves of which there are three towers and some fortifications. From the esplanade we have a magnificent view of the surrounding plain, there is also an orientation table.
Clara Piccato (14 months ago)
Very nice corner, magnificent view. The village is full of charm, the alleys are splendid, very clean. A little corner of paradise away from the crowds. To do without hesitation!
Claudine CharlesJacquier (16 months ago)
Very nice point of view
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