Musée de l’Annonciade

Saint-Tropez, France

Musée de l’Annonciade is one of the oldest modern art galleries in France. This 16th-century former chapel in Place Grammont contains some dross but also cracking stuff from artists connected with Provence in general and St Tropez in particular. Look out for Matisse, Utrillo, Seurat and Dufy. You should also have a look at the pointillist works of Signac, the first artist into St Tropez in the late 19th century.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1922
Category: Museums in France

More Information

www.seesainttropez.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frederic Lucas (2 years ago)
Very nice museum
Harvey Mains (3 years ago)
A small but lovely museum showing artists who painted scenes of the area from the early 1900’s thru the seventies. The art is displayed wonderfully, with sitting areas everywhere to contemplate the art. Well worth a visit.
Arran Paul (4 years ago)
Very lovely little museum with an interesting history and collection of art.
J. BISBAL (4 years ago)
Lovely little museum with its own cat. It used to be a chapel, now houses great pointillist art by the local Signac as well as a couple of nice sculptures as well as some Matisse, Braque and Picasso.
Nico G (6 years ago)
Often overlooked and located at the end of the waterfront, this small museum in a former chapel is not to be missed! Great art collection and the perfect spot to cool down on a hot day!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.