Chateau des Clées is located above the village. Built probably in the 11th century, it guarded the traffic through the Jougne Pass and collected tolls on the pass road. Les Clées is first mentioned in 1134 when Pope Innocent II tried in vain to prohibit the reconstruction of the castle. 

The chapel of Les Clées was built before the 14th century and rebuilt in 1738-1740.

In 1444 the Duke Louis I of Savoy commissioned the renovations of the walls. During the Burgundian War, on 22 October 1475, Swiss Confederation troops seized and destroyed the city and castle and killed the castle garrison. Under Bernese rule there were three courts in the Les Clées district, one of which was held in the city. Nevertheless, the city gradually lost importance.

Today Les Clées Castle with the surrounding ruins and village is listed as a Swiss heritage site of national significance.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Solinaria (21 months ago)
Seraphima Nickolaevna Bogomolova (2 years ago)
A charming historical place, just a short walk from the Les Clees chapel up the hill. Although the Les Clees Chateau itself is a private property it is possible to walk around its grounds and admire the outer architecture of the restored in the 19th century part and the 12 century ancient stones of the part that lies in ruins. The grounds of the castle are not big, but beautifully maintained, with old trees throwing the shade on the the green lawn with romantically placed here and there garden chairs. The garden chairs are for the residents though, not for the visitors to sit on. There is a nice view from the castle grounds. In 13th century the castle belonged to the Guillaume II, the Count of Geneva. The place possess some air of mystery around it and would be a perfect setting for a romantic mystery book or as a setting for similarly themed movie. At the foot of the hill on which the castle is situated there is an inn with a cafe/restaurant which is also open on Saturday and Sundays, so one can have a quick bit or a bigger meal there.
Marc Pantillon (2 years ago)
Endroit magnifique, plein de charme avec une touche de mystère...
Louise M. (3 years ago)
Das Paradis existiert
Claude Bernard Maeder (6 years ago)
Un lieu magique. Les chevalier y passait pour regoindre les deux versants
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